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This article is from the Binghamton, NY newspaper PressConnects.

http://www.pressconnects.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2008811270305

Time to take ammo bill seriously
November 27, 2008

Used to be whenever a downstate Assembly Democrat wrote legislation proposing a tax and/or severe restriction on the manufacture and sale of ammunition, it caused a ripple among the hunters and gun owners, but that quickly subsided. Everyone knew that radical measures involving ammunition and firearms were largely penned for effect in the Metropolitan area and that the Senate wasn't about to allow companion bills out of committee.

"Used to be" is the operative phrase here. New York's whole political and legislative landscape changed earlier this month and now the liberal and radically anti-gun, anti-hunting, etc. fervor that once thrived only in the Assembly now flows freely in those seats across the aisle.

That's why the fact that New York has bought into a national crusade known as the Ammunition Accountability Act is suddenly a legitimate threat. New York, Pennsylvania and so far 16 other states have enacted legislation -- in each case with virtually identical wording to the nationally lobbied Ammunition Accountability Act -- that would mandate the engraving of a unique serial number on the base of each handgun and "assault weapon" bullet and an identical number on the cartridge's case. The act calls for dealers of this "encoded ammunition" to record the purchaser's name, birth date, drivers license number, etc.

All non-encoded ammunition must be disposed of prior to Jan. 1, 2011. The database and other expenses involved would be paid for by a special tax of a half-cent per round of ammunition sold.

You can read the whole thing in Assembly Bill 10259, which was introduced last March (without a co-sponsor at the time). It mirrors A6920, A7300 and Senate companion bills S1177 and S3731, all of which were carried over from 2007.

Pennsylvania's House Bill 2228 is a virtual twin to the New York bills.

Remington and other ammunition manufacturers earlier this year went on record stating that they couldn't afford to sell in those states that required serialization of cartridges because it would be cost prohibitive. One assumes that this is precisely what the anti-gun folks want.

The Act's lobby maintains (and each bill carries this wording) that 30 percent of all homicides that involve a gun go unsolved and that handgun ammunition accounts for 80 percent of all ammunition sold in the United States.

For that 80 percent figure to be true, it must include .22LR ammunition, since rimfire sales volume just about equals all centerfire calibers combined. Since hunting and competition handguns of various forms can be chambered for a wide variety of centerfire rifle cartridges, the potential list of ammunition affected is gigantic
 

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Wow, encoded ammo. Whats next? And who's gonna throw all there non- coded ammo away? I guess they will come with search warrants to look for it. The next thing will be counterfeit coded bullets. Hey, maybe I have an idea here. Hmm?
 

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What of re-loads? I have a friend with over 2000 re-loads of different sizes. I know him well enough to know he wont give up on his "specialty :p rounds". Also, My cousin works for wal-mart sporting goods and I usually buy most ammo there. She told me wednesday (as I stocked up for my Thanksgiving backyard turkey shoot) that after the 1st of Jan. all ammo is going up 15% there, Probably everywhere else as well. This Christmas will be the third year since i've purchased my ruger 10-22. At the time I got it, the federal box of .22lr 550 count was about $10.97(IIRC). Wednesday they were :'($14.97!! This is getting scary!! :-\
 

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Guns and Ammo Magazine News Update

http://gunsandammomag.com/cs/Satellite/IMO_GA/Story_C/Update+on+Bullet+Serialization

NSSF Posted: 12-01-08 said:
During the past week, the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF)—the trade association for the firearms and ammunition industry—has received inquires concerning state legislation that would require the serialization of ammunition on a mass production basis.

Bullet serialization—the process by which each individual round of ammunition is identified and marked with a laser engraved serial number—is not feasible from a practical standpoint and any legislation mandating such action could rightfully be considered a de facto ban on ammunition.

While legislation has been introduced in more than 20 states, NSSF has successfully defeated all of these bills. NSSF will continue to closely monitor state or federal legislation to require bullet serialization and will continue to issue Legislative Alerts to industry members and Second Amendment advocates in those states when bills are introduced or scheduled for a hearing or vote.

Demonstrating the effectiveness of the NSSF Legislative Alert system, several bullet serialization bill sponsors withdrew their bills immediately following public outcry stemming from the NSSF alerts—in the case of Kentucky, this was within 48 hours of the bill's introduction.
 

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i believe it is the gun owners themselves who will push this legislation into existence. there are just way too many instances of gun owners bring it up during debates (to people who don't know it exists), writing their state and federal gvt expressing displeasure that their state is "on the list" and bring it up every day and pointing the finger at the other person. it's dead but gun owners won't let it die for some reason. :'(
 
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