Ruger Pistol Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This entry will NOT be considered a "YARN". Yarns are defined as "Long, and often elaborate stories, that are often not very interesting".
I'll keep it short and leave out most of the "interesting stuff", so this doesn't become a "yarn". :sleep:
The Ruger Mark pistol hammer notch is an integral part when it comes to adjusting trigger pull weight and "CREEP". What most "newbie" Ruger Mark single pistol owners, along with some who actually own two pistols, don't understand is that the parts in these pistols have manufacturing tolerances involved when they are being machined. That usually involves a nominal dimension +/- several thousandths of an inch. Some expect, for example, a 3-pound trigger pull should come out exactly at 3-pounds. Ignorance personified. To know where parts are at, involving the tolerance "zone", parts need to be measured:

That requires purchasing the equipment to do that sort of thing and also the knowledge on how to use it. Let alone, the training and knowledge on HOW to remove metal and keep the pistols action safe.

Over time, I've measured and recorded the sear to hammer notch depth, on Ruger Mark I, II, III, IV hammers along with several of the aftermarket hammers as offered by VC. Are the dimensions all the same on each of these variably manufactured hammers? Don't bet your mother-in-laws false teeth on that. Here is a "partial" picture of the measurements that I've done on every factory Ruger Mark hammer and aftermarket hammer, including several of the AMT Lightning hammers, that I have in my inventory, which involves up to 7 of each variety:

No, I left the text box off with all that information that was gathered. WHY? Because there are a few around here who just like to quibble and criticize things that they just don't have the knowledge to understand. Too bad, the variation in the dimension on this particular part is quite interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
It's normally a GOOD thing, that, in most cases, those who get themselves involved with doing so-called "trigger-jobs" , actually study and learn the original aspects involved with how the particular trigger system works. If that's NOT done, how can any actual improvement be accomplished and where does that person even start?
The Ruger Mark pistol trigger system is unique to itself, and when those who compare it to how a1911 trigger system works, the analogy fails, big time.
Another aspect involved with Ruger Mark pistols is how much the sear engages the hammer notch as it arrives from the factory. Is it the very same amount of engagement on every Ruger Mark pistol that Ruger has sold since 1949? If you can't answer that question yourself, stop reading this post right now, you're beyond HOPE:

So far, that's two dimensional aspects involved with the Ruger Mark pistol trigger system where variance will be found. There are several others involved with the system also. Does anyone wonder just WHY there are some of the other components provided with these so-called "Accuracy Kits" that are really "Performance Kits" designed to help the pistol perform better? Why are those parts included?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It completely amazes me, that when something is posted, as an "informational addition", someone who doesn't know diarrhea from good brown gravy, as far as what's involved with a "trigger job" goes, will take this as something that can just be done simply without any consequences being involved. They CLAIM that they can actually FEEL what a trigger pull measures, and don't need no "stinkeen trigger gauge". o_O I gotta learn to avoid Bozo's like that, and not get involved with ANY of their hair-brain ideas involving what ridiculous adventure they WANT to get me involved in.
"Well, I seen the picture, so I want that done and I want that done to my XXXXX pistol so I get a PERFECT 2-pound trigger pull that works perfectly every time".
While it definitely is TRUE, that some "CREEP", as I posted above, can indeed be lessened by a very judicious "cut and try" procedure, there is no magic measurement of metal removal that will work the first time, every time, for every XXXXX pistols trigger system. That it can, only comes from the complete ignorance (STUPIDITY?) of somebody who just doesn't get it and sure doesn't want to try doing the job themselves without having the correct knowledge, fixtures, tooling and machinery to perform the task. Funny, when I asked this yokel how much metal he wanted removed from the hammer shelf to get the amount of creep he could put up with, I think I could actually hear a thud from his jaw dropping on his keyboard. :ROFLMAO:
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top