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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



The latest upgrade to America's favorite ultra-compact pistol: the LCP® MAX. Chambered in .380 Auto, the Ruger® LCP® MAX fits 10+1 rounds into the same footprint as the LCP® II. Compact and lightweight, the LCP® MAX continues to be the definitive pocket-sized personal protection pistol.
  • MODEL NUMBER: 13716
  • CALIBER: 380 AUTO
  • Capacity10+1
  • Slide MaterialAlloy Steel
  • Slide FinishBlack Oxide
  • Slide Width0.81"
  • Grip FrameBlack, High-Performance, Glass-Filled Nylon

  • Barrel MaterialAlloy Steel
  • Barrel FinishBlack Oxide
  • Barrel Length2.80"
  • Overall Length5.17"
  • Front SightTritium with White Outline
  • Rear SightDrift Adjustable

  • Weight10.6 oz.
  • Height4.12"
  • Grooves6
  • Twist1:16" RH
  • Available in CANo
  • Available in MANo
  • UPC7-36676-13716-9
  • Suggested Retail$449.00

  • Compact and lightweight, the LCP® MAX continues to be the definitive pocket-sized personal protection pistol.
  • Standard 10+1 capacity magazine ships with flush floorplate installed. 12-round magazines available at ShopRuger.com.
  • Textured grip frame provides a secure and comfortable grip. Utilizing the 12-round magazine, or included finger grip extension floorplate with the 10-round magazine, allows most shooters a full-firing grip.
  • Slide features raised cocking ears and functional serrations for easy manipulation.
  • Slide and frame surfaces and edges are soft and smooth for comfortable carry and handling.
  • Tritium front sight with white outline makes for fast acquisition in all light conditions.
  • Rear sight features a generous u-notch for easy alignment and a square front face for one-handed cocking. Sight dovetails are sized to accept all aftermarket BodyGuard-pattern sights.
  • Improved magazine feed lips, feed ramp, extractor, and barrel cam geometries.
  • Patented barrel cam geometry delays unlocking, slows the slide, and ultimately reduces felt recoil compared to other .380 Auto pistols.
  • Fits most existing LCP® II holsters.
  • Reversible magazine release.
  • Also includes: one, 10-round magazine; soft pocket holster; magazine loader.
I am not a .380 fan but I am going to get one .

Ruger® LCP® MAX Centerfire Pistol Models
 

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Love it!

At least 4 video reviews have been posted on youtube in the last 24 hours too.

I am slightly bummed in that I bought an LCP ii last week.

I want one... lcp ii 380 is my main carry right now, this one will replace it.
 

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This is kind of fun to see just because you can imagine someone running around the Ruger factory shouting: "MAX ALL THE THINGS!".
(Maybe they will "MAX" the 1911, and accidentally reintroduce/rediscover the P Series...).

It gets the grain elevator shaped magazine for the extra capacity.
Removable sights, but the front is tritium without the fiber optic.
No optic mount.
The LCP apparently did not have that side mounted safety (I'm not familiar enough to know), so they can't brag about the "1911 style safety", like the Max-9.
The appearance of the II was already the newer styling. The slide does not look like it changed much at all. The decoration of the grip frame becomes more of an inlay in the grip surface, leaving the trail. Possible parts interchangeability, or they just look so close to the II but can not be made to fit. The cross pins holding the grip insert to the grip frame disappear, so that probably dashes hope of switching out the grip frame on a II to upgrade for more capacity.
Revised naming convention. It does not get the name "Max-380".

Also funny that "Max-9" has cemented itself into the firearms community in the last three months to the point that some of the reviews have this identified as the "LCP Max 9mm; in .380 caliber".
 

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I think we can dispense with the LDP (Last Ditch Pistol) pidgeonholing of the LCP now too. The "Max" version adds enough features to move it a bit towards the mainstream carry category (but still for those who like it small). I like the choice of mag sizes, you can go subcompact, or expand the grip a bit and get more of a compact feel.

I need a laser/light combo to make it as versatile as my Glock 42 though, still waiting for one of those. Laser-alone will have to do for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is kind of fun to see just because you can imagine someone running around the Ruger factory shouting: "MAX ALL THE THINGS!".
(Maybe they will "MAX" the 1911, and accidentally reintroduce/rediscover the P Series...).

It gets the grain elevator shaped magazine for the extra capacity.
Removable sights, but the front is tritium without the fiber optic.
No optic mount.
The LCP apparently did not have that side mounted safety (I'm not familiar enough to know), so they can't brag about the "1911 style safety", like the Max-9.
The appearance of the II was already the newer styling. The slide does not look like it changed much at all. The decoration of the grip frame becomes more of an inlay in the grip surface, leaving the trail. Possible parts interchangeability, or they just look so close to the II but can not be made to fit. The cross pins holding the grip insert to the grip frame disappear, so that probably dashes hope of switching out the grip frame on a II to upgrade for more capacity.
Revised naming convention. It does not get the name "Max-380".

Also funny that "Max-9" has cemented itself into the firearms community in the last three months to the point that some of the reviews have this identified as the "LCP Max 9mm; in .380 caliber".
I would like to SEE at Ruger LCPII MAX .22 Magnum pistol ?
 

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I would like to SEE at Ruger LCPII MAX .22 Magnum pistol ?
Just an FYI,I just rec'd from Ruger, the new Threaded barrel set up for the LCPII, .22lr. I immediately put it on my LCPII and test fired with a Gemtech Outback II, with Monocore update by Gemtech. It works! I used CCI Silent at 720 fps, which would not cycle the action for obvious reasons. I also used the Std at 1070 fps which worked fine! The Barrel comes with an adapter for the threads and suppressor, and a std. thread protector for the barrel itself, not for the adapter. You can run the barrel with the std thread protector and it is like the std barrel, meaning you can field strip the firerarm etc, remove barrel and recoil spring etc. When you remove the thread protector and put on the 1/2 x28 adaptor, you can no longer field strip the piece, because the adaptor has a "shoulder" on it for the can to mount against and will not fit through the slide. So, you must remove it when you want to field strip the firearm. Ruger includes a small wrench to help with removal. There is also an extra spring which is longer than stock and therefore provides a bit heavier force to handle the extra weight of the adaptor and can. However, be sure to read the instructions! You do not need to use this spring if your can is under 3.5oz. total weight. I have several cans for the .22l/.22WMR and the Gemtech is light only 2.8oz, and worked perfectly with the stock spring. So far so good, will update in the future if any issue arise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just an FYI,I just rec'd from Ruger, the new Threaded barrel set up for the LCPII, .22lr. I immediately put it on my LCPII and test fired with a Gemtech Outback II, with Monocore update by Gemtech. It works! I used CCI Silent at 720 fps, which would not cycle the action for obvious reasons. I also used the Std at 1070 fps which worked fine! The Barrel comes with an adapter for the threads and suppressor, and a std. thread protector for the barrel itself, not for the adapter. You can run the barrel with the std thread protector and it is like the std barrel, meaning you can field strip the firerarm etc, remove barrel and recoil spring etc. When you remove the thread protector and put on the 1/2 x28 adaptor, you can no longer field strip the piece, because the adaptor has a "shoulder" on it for the can to mount against and will not fit through the slide. So, you must remove it when you want to field strip the firearm. Ruger includes a small wrench to help with removal. There is also an extra spring which is longer than stock and therefore provides a bit heavier force to handle the extra weight of the adaptor and can. However, be sure to read the instructions! You do not need to use this spring if your can is under 3.5oz. total weight. I have several cans for the .22l/.22WMR and the Gemtech is light only 2.8oz, and worked perfectly with the stock spring. So far so good, will update in the future if any issue arise.
Yes I know all about the threaded barrel and have no interest in them on hand guns what so ever. I like them on a rifle because they do tone down the report .
 

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My local gun store got 2 LCP Max guns in yesterday, I got the last one this morning by accident. I mentioned I wanted one and they said here ya go. It was one of those "I went to the range, bought a gun on impulse, and shot it" kind of days. That's a good day.

I am able to shoot this gun a little better than the LCP ii (with the default smaller mags on both of them as that's how I carry). I suspect it's because I can get a better grip on the LCP Max.

Here it is with a lasermax grip-activated green laser on it - love that I can draw it and it's already on. I transferred the laser at the range from my LCP ii 380. It fits perfectly and seems to be holding zero well enough.

20210702_145719_small.jpg
 

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This is kind of fun to see just because you can imagine someone running around the Ruger factory shouting: "MAX ALL THE THINGS!".
(Maybe they will "MAX" the 1911, and accidentally reintroduce/rediscover the P Series...).
I love what Ruger is doing and support them. If they would revisit the "P" series and or the 1911 I would love that too.
*I just hope and pray that the new "Max" line(s) are dependable and go bang with each trigger pull. I am going to wait and see before I replace my LCPII or my EC9s. Both are running great but I am interested in what Ruger just came out with.
 
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I can't believe the laser site fits that well because the trigger guard is slightly different from the LCP2 where it merges back into the frame. Did you modify it to fit, kurth83? It looks like it is factory fit and even follows a lot of the lines modeled into the barrel area. Congrats on the purchase and please give me/us some feedback on the frame design (good and bad). You can't hurt my feelings because I don't have any ;).

I designed the LCP MAX frame under contract for Ruger:

I convinced Ruger to take a risk on this project and abandon the LCP-2 style grip for a grip with optimized ergonomics above all else (for it's size constraints) to maximize shooting performance. An EDC gun you hated to shoot made zero sense to me as it's statistically the gun you are most likely to use in a stressful situation as a civilian. Once everyone held the 3D printed prototypes in hand, it was pretty clear which way to proceed. I spent a good deal of time surfacing this frame for them, trying to make everything fit, and still have it moldable. I wish I could take credit for all the other improvements the rest of the Ruger team made to this platform that everyone is raving about, but I'm just a contract engineer (plastics guy). This project has been in development for a while and it's nice to finally see your own work materialize into what is hopefully a success.

It's funny that I spent many hours trying to perfect certain areas and surface transitions around the trigger that no one notices or mentions in reviews, but everyone mentions how great the back slide ears are which took about 10min to model. Ergonomic design is a "no news is great news" business though.
 

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I made no mods, I noticed I had to press the laser onto the trigger guard a bit, as if it didn't quite fit perfectly (it did not require much force, nor would I have used it on a delicate thing like that), but it was close enough that once it was mounted and zeroed it worked perfectly. For my part being able to swap lasers is a big win, even if there were slight changes around the trigger guard. :)

I guess your writeup helps explain why this gun is easier to shoot. I am not a good enough shooter to know why, only that my groups are slightly tighter and it feels a tad better to shoot. As I mentioned before the grip feels better, at least in my hands which aren't large. The slightly less recoil could be a factor too. To me it is an evolutionary step forward for what was already a great gun (and my favorite), to an even better one that is my new favorite. :) The best part is nothing was made worse, everything got better, and it pretty much met every desire for this gun that I am aware of, without sacrificing any of the qualities that made the gun great to begin with.

And I think you are right, it edged more into the realm of where it is fun to shoot. I put in 50 rounds at the range today, and it was enjoyable, I was not even slightly fatigued at the end of it, and wanted to do more. I also put 100 rounds through the LCP II 22 (much cheaper to do that). :)
 

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I made no mods, I noticed I had to press the laser onto the trigger guard a bit, as if it didn't quite fit perfectly (it did not require much force, nor would I have used it on a delicate thing like that), but it was close enough that once it was mounted and zeroed it worked perfectly. For my part being able to swap lasers is a big win, even if there were slight changes around the trigger guard. :)

I guess your writeup helps explain why this gun is easier to shoot. I am not a good enough shooter to know why, only that my groups are slightly tighter and it feels a tad better to shoot. As I mentioned before the grip feels better, at least in my hands which aren't large. The slightly less recoil could be a factor too. To me it is an evolutionary step forward for what was already a great gun (and my favorite), to an even better one that is my new favorite. :) The best part is nothing was made worse, everything got better, and it pretty much met every desire for this gun that I am aware of, without sacrificing any of the qualities that made the gun great to begin with.

And I think you are right, it edged more into the realm of where it is fun to shoot. I put in 50 rounds at the range today, and it was enjoyable, I was not even slightly fatigued at the end of it, and wanted to do more. I also put 100 rounds through the LCP II 22 (much cheaper to do that). :)
Understand that I don't speak on behalf of Ruger in any way. They are a great company, with very talented people that I loved working with. I'd also love to do more projects for them ;).

If any gun has features that aren't ergonomic to the user, it's going to affect shooting performance. It sounds obvious, but remember next time you buy that goddy accessory that really does nothing for your shooting besides look cool in the case. These could be poor sights, painful grip, extreme weight either way, etc. I can't ask you to accurately and repeatably shoot a gun that weights 50lbs, cuts your hands, with sights you can't see through, etc. Messi doesn't play soccer/football with a rock in his shoe, let me tell you. All pistol grips are shot back into your "thumb crotch" area (fancy medical term) upon firing: hard, very hard. If you don't manage that impact/damage to the hands as a grip/frame designer, you are harming your operator. I didn't want to design a product that did that ;). Unfortunately, some of the historical micro sized products on the market made those sacrifices just for the sake of being the smallest IMO. I didn't even want to hold them, rather shoot them. OK, let's try to change that with the LCP MAX we are developing. Let's assume all current micro guns (Ruger's included) might be putting "rocks in our shooting shoes" with their design.

The entire development team tried to make a "usable gun" that you can comfortably shoot, practice with, get effective with, carry (anywhere), and hopefully never have to use...but if you did, you'd protect yourself and loved ones. If you don't shoot competitively or are in law enforcement, what other pistol would you really need? If you get in more trouble than this can handle (as a civilian), I question if you are on the right side of the law in the first place. This is a super little gun for "real" people to EDC. If you currently EDC or want to start training to EDC, there is no better gun IMO. When you leave your house, you don't take your desktop with you, you take your smart phone. This is the smart phone (or Camry), of pistols. It's 80% of a normal sized pistol and that is just fine to settle things down. If you leave your house with .8 of a pistol that is much better than 0.0 of a larger, heavy pistol (you now keep in a locked cabinet because it doesn't travel well every day) when you get in a bad situation. Just make sure you have a legitimate reason to EDC. I certainly don't feel the need to EDC so this isn't the gun for me.....despite being very proud of it, feeling it could be a huge seller, and a great product for those that EDC. Ex police, military, people who deal with dangerous people daily, yeah this is your new EDC and you will love it.:) 12 round mag is a no brainer and perfects the gun IMO, (as long as it's legal in your area).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I can't believe the laser site fits that well because the trigger guard is slightly different from the LCP2 where it merges back into the frame. Did you modify it to fit, kurth83? It looks like it is factory fit and even follows a lot of the lines modeled into the barrel area. Congrats on the purchase and please give me/us some feedback on the frame design (good and bad). You can't hurt my feelings because I don't have any ;).

I designed the LCP MAX frame under contract for Ruger:

I convinced Ruger to take a risk on this project and abandon the LCP-2 style grip for a grip with optimized ergonomics above all else (for it's size constraints) to maximize shooting performance. An EDC gun you hated to shoot made zero sense to me as it's statistically the gun you are most likely to use in a stressful situation as a civilian. Once everyone held the 3D printed prototypes in hand, it was pretty clear which way to proceed. I spent a good deal of time surfacing this frame for them, trying to make everything fit, and still have it moldable. I wish I could take credit for all the other improvements the rest of the Ruger team made to this platform that everyone is raving about, but I'm just a contract engineer (plastics guy). This project has been in development for a while and it's nice to finally see your own work materialize into what is hopefully a success.

It's funny that I spent many hours trying to perfect certain areas and surface transitions around the trigger that no one notices or mentions in reviews, but everyone mentions how great the back slide ears are which took about 10min to model. Ergonomic design is a "no news is great news" business though.
Hey Plastics guy what about an after market stock for the Ruger PC 9 9MM rifle ? Like the FAB Defense Stock for the 10/22 ????
 

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Hey Plastics guy what about an after market stock for the Ruger PC 9 9MM rifle ? Like the FAB Defense Stock for the 10/22 ????
Are you funding this very expensive endeavor? I'd estimate the injection mold to cost about $130K for that...then there is my design time. IIRC, pistol-frame sized molds are around $50K-70K with the 4 slide actions to pull the cores (2 for mag and slide cores, 2 for the F+R textured areas). It takes big money to make things inexpensive.
 

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Are you funding this very expensive endeavor? I'd estimate the injection mold to cost about $130K for that...then there is my design time. IIRC, pistol-frame sized molds are around $50K-70K with the 4 slide actions to pull the cores (2 for mag and slide cores, 2 for the F+R textured areas). It takes big money to make things inexpensive.
Fifty to seventy thousand dollars to make a mold for a pistol grip frame...
So, no chance Ruger would offer a grip frame to fit the LC9s or LCPii frame inserts, that would allow their past customers to switch over to the larger capacity magazines. (OK, Ruger has the grip frames needlesly flagged as not offered for sale in the owner's manuals [though the frame insert is the actual controlled part]. But they are now selling a threaded barrel kit for the LCP .22 cal, so the idea is less forbidden than a couple years ago.) Their piece cost to manufacture would be closer to the "pennies" range. They sell for $50+ for used from gun dismantlers.
Not sure if a smaller volume private venture could be done for less investment. Somehow, they are making aftermarket Sig grip frames for the 80% market. I'll bet they sell a lot, but not enough to pay for a fifty to seventy thousand dollars in mold.
Sort of makes milling it out of a solid block of plastic sound like a cheap alternative.
I'm still not familiar enough with 3d scanning and 3d printing. How fine the resolution has to be for something like a grip frame and the textures for diamond and stipple surfaces? And if it would hold up to use? Glass fiber nylon is available for 3d printing. The fibers in the injection molded and 3d printed use are tiny, and not long strand. One of the Max-9 reviews explains that the mag well is extremely thin and designed to flex to absorb recoil. That sounds like a possible fatigue problem in the making, possibly more for a 3d printed item.

As far as the ergonomic overhaul:
It seems like there would be a shape/dimension adjustment for changing a grip to surround a narrow single stack magazine to a wider double stack magazine. The hand would be expected to wrap around a similar circumference, and the single stack would have a wider front-to-back dimension, than a double stack, in order to come up with that similar circumference. The back of the grip forms a frame section for rigidity, and would be made smaller in front-to-back dimension to accomplish this.
The change in silhouette from the LC9s to the Max-9 shows some pretty obvious changes in the grip shape and a deeper cut around the back so that the web of the hand fits deeper into the grip.
The change in silhouette from the LCPii to the Max-.380 is a lot less obvious. The thumb recess is very different. And the change in the side decoration and stippling is very different.
Another one of those things that I am anxious to see photos of the two side-by-side to really appreciate the changes. Good photos comparing the rear view of the LC9s and Max-9, and the thin wall mag well, did not show up for over a month after the release.

Did I read the spec comparison correctly that the Max .380 is a quarter inch taller than the LCPii? Seems like that would make a big improvement in finger space on the grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow much goes into it , I had no Idea ! WOW ! BIG BUCKS !!!!
 

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Two questions, if I may.
1 What is the street price for the Max?.

2 Is it +P rated ?.

Thanks boo
 

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Two questions, if I may.
1 What is the street price for the Max?.

2 Is it +P rated ?.

Thanks boo
What I could find on +P

380 Automatic Ammunition

The LCP MAX is listed as a standard 380 Automatic ammunition pistol and is not for use with “+P” ammunition. Which is all good as the 380 Automatic has no SAAMI +P version. 380 Auto +P is the creation of independent ammo0 manufacturers, each deciding what +P means in regard to pressure. Ruger could hardly be expected to sign on to +P ammo when there is no spec to use as the basis for testing.

Unless part of a project that specifically requires the evaluation or use of 380 Auto +P ammo, I never use it. 380 Auto +P ammo does not add appreciable lethality to the round. If I needed more, I would just carry a 9mm Luger…. which I do on occasion where concealment is not challenging.


Personal opinion: The compact/concealable/pocket (micro) sized pistols should not be fed +P ammunition unless you consider them to be disposable. They are not built as robust as the pistols from the pre-plastic, pre-striker-fired, pre-tiny-concealment-auto era.

Price:
Based on the Max 9, I would expect pricing to be slightly above suggested retail for several months ($25-50 over).
The firearms market is still crazy with the convergence of the plague, the anti-gun party in control of the white house, the attacks on the Second Amendment, the ongoing audits, the riots, the skyrocketing crime rate. None of these things ended, and they are all dragging on with continued threat to reignite big. Anything that throws lead is getting premium prices. The used market jumped $200+.
 

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Two questions, if I may.
1 What is the street price for the Max?.

2 Is it +P rated ?.

Thanks boo
I paid $380 at Bass Pro.
My understanding is that there is no SAAMI standard for +P on .380acp
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Two questions, if I may.
1 What is the street price for the Max?.

2 Is it +P rated ?.

Thanks boo
About $385.00 and yes it will handle .380 ammo try the Federal .380 Punch or HST Ammo .
 
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