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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's not hard to believe that there have been 6 million +, Ruger 10/22 rifles produced since first introduced in 1964.
I have personally dealt with quite a few of these fine .22 rimfire caliber rifles, and have even fashioned several from those who offer aftermarket parts so that a 10/22 owner can personalize a 10/22 style rifle to their very own liking.

Several years ago, I did an over-winter project and assembled a 10/22 clone from parts offered by Tony Kidd:



The receiver, barrel, trigger system and bolt components were all of Tony Kidd's design and offerings:



The barreled action was firmly bedded into a Hogue laminated stock, and it shoots great for its intended purpose.
 

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Yes, there are enough aftermarket parts for sale now that you can build a 10-22 clone and not use one original Ruger part. It depends on how big your wallet is or how high a credit limit you have on your credit card. Will the clone be better than a regular 10-22 yes. Is it that much better for the money invested using aftermarket parts that is the big question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, there are enough aftermarket parts for sale now that you can build a 10-22 clone and not use one original Ruger part. It depends on how big your wallet is or how high a credit limit you have on your credit card. Will the clone be better than a regular 10-22 yes. Is it that much better for the money invested using aftermarket parts that is the big question.
To answer that question, you'll need to do some comparisons between "factory stock" 10/22 rifles and then, one that's been assembled from all Tactical Solutions, Volquartsen, KIDD or Clark Custom 10/22 clone parts. You will be amazed at how much difference many of the aftermarket barrels increase accuracy, but that's only proven when you actually get involved. Guessing whether or not aftermarket clones are better or even-up with a factory 10/22, will NEVER get you what you ask to know.
Am anxious to read your report on those comparisons. I've actually found out and know what the comparison is between my Tony KIDD complete assembly and a factory stock Ruger 10/22, 'cause I've done it. (y)
 

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Sorry to disappoint you but I have not done a report comparing a factory 10-22 and a 10-22 built with Kidd, Clark or Volquartsen parts nor do I plan on doing one. Their are plenty of reviews on the internet about the different make and models of 10-22's and how they stack up against each other if one wants to take the time to read all of them. My main point was, do you get that much difference in quality and accuracy between a stock 10-22 and a highly modified 10-22 for the money invested to mod one.

If I was going to dump a lot of money in a 10-22 I would buy one already built from Kidd, Volquartsen or maybe go all out and buy a Voodoo. That way if the rifle does not perform as expected you have the factory warranty rather than dicking around with the rifle trying to figure out why it does not perform as expected.
 

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Sorry to disappoint you but I have not done a report comparing a factory 10-22 and a 10-22 built with Kidd, Clark or Volquartsen parts nor do I plan on doing one. Their are plenty of reviews on the internet about the different make and models of 10-22's and how they stack up against each other if one wants to take the time to read all of them. My main point was, do you get that much difference in quality and accuracy between a stock 10-22 and a highly modified 10-22 for the money invested to mod one.

If I was going to dump a lot of money in a 10-22 I would buy one already built from Kidd, Volquartsen or maybe go all out and buy a Voodoo. That way if the rifle does not perform as expected you have the factory warranty rather than dicking around with the rifle trying to figure out why it does not perform as expected.
I have owned over 20 10/22's and now have only three originals in Carbine,Sporter and Mannlicher format. They shoot fine. If you are looking for the absolute best High End $$ "match" winning accuracy, a barrel and trigger will help alot, but then you need to be able to shoot that well and most people ranting here can't do it, regardless of their claims. I have shot Olympic style NRA Competiton Small Bore with my brother, across the USA, for years, and equipment started to make a difference when you were in the top 10% of shooters. Most started with a Mossberg, then a Winchester 52 etc., and ended up with various Anschutz models fully decked out if they were serious, and they were $thousands 20 yrs ago!Then you had rails, sights, butt plates, stocks, shooting coats, gloves, slings on and on. So, if you want the absolute finest accuracy the mechanicals can supply, yes, certain parts or rifles will deliver it. However in the end, you have to be capable of utilizing the inherent accuracy of the platform and that is a whole other story! For me, those days are long gone, and I am very happy with a 10/22 that will shoot 1/2 to 3/4 in at 50 yds, because I personally can't really do any better than that. I have a Ruger Precision .22 that will shoot 1/2 all day long with proper ammo, and that makes me smile, especially when I look at the cost versus performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sorry to disappoint you but I have not done a report comparing a factory 10-22 and a 10-22 built with Kidd, Clark or Volquartsen parts nor do I plan on doing one. Their are plenty of reviews on the internet about the different make and models of 10-22's and how they stack up against each other if one wants to take the time to read all of them. My main point was, do you get that much difference in quality and accuracy between a stock 10-22 and a highly modified 10-22 for the money invested to mod one.
Ah yes, the magnificent "internet" where honesty reigns SUPREME in every review done by the Steven Spielberg wannabes, who have a You Tube channel and high hopes of having a sponsored TV show on an obscure channel at 3:00 AM.

Those testing ONE single rifle, or any firearm of any make or model, can hardly be raised to the pedestal of "Expert" and decry that all the other versions of that one firearm they tested does, or does not, live up to every buyers high expectations. That's only a single "tainted" review of the one rifle they bought, or like "45 Hiccup", was a firearm he was sent. Anybody here actually think Mr. Hiccup would receive anything but a tested already, "golden version"? You don't really NEED to read ALL of the reviews, in fact, you're better off not reading any of them. If you end up with a faulty firearm, send the dang thing back and complain to the maker.
Even for many normal buyers, it's hard to admit that they bought a gun that doesn't do what it was intended to do. I do read the reviews of those who write for "Gun Tests", mainly because they take NO advertising, purchase guns over the counter, just like most all gun owners do, test the tarnation out of that firearm and then write about what the "group" of testers actually experienced, with YES, that single firearm, but at least the tests do include the faulty issues found, if there were any of importance.
 

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Yes that is the beauty of the internet. You can get on the internet and proclaim yourself to be an expert and I can get on the internet and proclaim myself to be an expert. As the old saying goes money talks and Bullshit walks. Sure a lot of Bullshit around here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Yes that is the beauty of the internet. You can get on the internet and proclaim yourself to be an expert and I can get on the internet and proclaim myself to be an expert. As the old saying goes money talks and Bullshit walks. Sure a lot of Bullshit around here.
Call it out when you read it. Post your rebuttal with proof otherwise. That's one way to quell what you consider BS. Nothing wrong with a good adult debate on some topic. Sitting back and doing nothing about "misguided" information doesn't help any GOOD folks who come to this site to get a question answered. And WAG's don't help either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sorry to disappoint you but I have not done a report comparing a factory 10-22 and a 10-22 built with Kidd, Clark or Volquartsen parts nor do I plan on doing one. Their are plenty of reviews on the internet about the different make and models of 10-22's and how they stack up against each other if one wants to take the time to read all of them. My main point was, do you get that much difference in quality and accuracy between a stock 10-22 and a highly modified 10-22 for the money invested to mod one.

If I was going to dump a lot of money in a 10-22 I would buy one already built from Kidd, Volquartsen or maybe go all out and buy a Voodoo. That way if the rifle does not perform as expected you have the factory warranty rather than dicking around with the rifle trying to figure out why it does not perform as expected.
If you choose the Voodoo, grab a pile of 35 Benjamins, and that doesn't even include any optics. That's quite a bunch too rich for my tastes. The KIDD system I assembled was less than a third of that cost, and it included a very nice optic.
Most all of the 0.920 O.D. 10/22 replacement barrels produced, of which I've installed and tested several brands, all shot much better than the factory barrel did, so that would be the first expenditure I would recommend for anyone coming here for advice.
 

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I have found the Thompson Ctr Tcr22 to be an excellent alternative to the Ruger. I own several orig. conf. Ruger 10/22's but I use the TC quite a bit. The TC has a built in rail, the bolt is machined not cast, it has a hold open feature on the mag, but will also use std Ruger mags. The stock is a Magpul stock branded for TC, and there are fixed adj sights and a threaded barrel. The rifling is different than the Ruger,, I am not certain, but it is not the std 1-16 but I believe 1-15? I could be wrong on that. This package can be found for $300 which makes it very competitive with the Ruger with alot of upgrades already included. The TC shoots as well as I can, and that is all that really matters to me at this point in life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
^^^^But now, the Ruger 10/22 is also available for left-hand shooters. I don't see that for the T/C? LHSLM (LeftHandShootersLivesMatter)
 

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Yes, if you are a lefty the choices are much less. Ruger must feel that there is enough of a market to make the necessary changes in design & production $$ to warrant the introduction of the Left hand model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ruger does it right, after all, at last count there are 6-million Ruger 10/22 rifles out there. Must be WHY plenty of others are trying to catch up with their "copies" of that successful offering.
Doesn't really matter "how many" left hand shooters are out there, at least Ruger has enough 'customer concern' to offer that option for those left handed folks, even if they only make 1,000 of 'em. Heck, they make commemorative 10/22's in less numbers than that! All that's needed is to make a few edits to the receiver machining program, and switch the bolt handle over.......and viola!
 

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Receiver machining program? That's almost funny. The 10/22 receiver is cast, most machining marks are carried over from machining the die. Ruger had to make a new die for the left handed carbine. And most likely there is also a new magazine. There is a great youtube series on the process. Den
 

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Receiver machining program? That's almost funny. The 10/22 receiver is cast, most machining marks are carried over from machining the die. Ruger had to make a new die for the left handed carbine. And most likely there is also a new magazine. There is a great youtube series on the process. Den
The receivers are cast but there is "finishing" maching done to the casting to clean it up and ensure proper dimensions. Yes, an entire new magazine was engineered from the original design10/22 mag. It has a different color follower and is marked with an L on the front. It also rotates in the opposite direction of the original. Other that that it is a clone of the original, just a "mirror" version, for good reason. The original 10/22 mags is one of the most successful designs ever made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Receiver machining program? That's almost funny. The 10/22 receiver is cast, most machining marks are carried over from machining the die. Ruger had to make a new die for the left handed carbine. And most likely there is also a new magazine. There is a great you tube series on the process. Den
Funny? How so? You're kinda late to the party denoting that the "original 10/22" receiver is investment cast. Most folks have known that for quite a few years now. And BTW, the bolt for the left-hand version is NOT cast, it is fully CNC machined, same as the receiver. So, it is NEW and not really a clone of the original.
If anyone wants to get the REAL, and ACCURATE scoop, on what the new left-hand version of the Ruger 10/22 entails, just go to the Ruger.com site and read it from the manufacturer. That way you will get the correct information. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have been looking for a 10/22 compact with wood stock for months and cannot find one. For some strange reason, my local dealer says he cannot order me one. What gives?.
I'm not sure what you exactly mean by a "10/22 compact" with a wood stock. The stock, or plain, Ruger 10/22 is offered in what some would call a more compact stock, or the carbine version. Is that what you are leaning toward?
 

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Ruger does it right, after all, at last count there are 6-million Ruger 10/22 rifles out there. Must be WHY plenty of others are trying to catch up with their "copies" of that successful offering.
Doesn't really matter "how many" left hand shooters are out there, at least Ruger has enough 'customer concern' to offer that option for those left handed folks, even if they only make 1,000 of 'em. Heck, they make commemorative 10/22's in less numbers than that! All that's needed is to make a few edits to the receiver machining program, and switch the bolt handle over.......and viola!
Well, I dunno. I have an ancient, beaten up original (??) Ruger 10/22 that I got in around 1975 - 76. Swapped climbing gear with a buddy for it. I shoot left-handed and have sent 1,000s of rounds downrange with that fine little rifle. Never have noticed anything untoward - ejected empties go past my nose so fast I don't notice them.

If, for some reason, I need to operate the action while shooting, I just continue to hold it by the pistol grip with left hand, reach across with right hand and do whatever is necessary. Even now, in my dotage, the rifle is light and handy enuf to where that is no problem.

LMB's point earlier about accuracy and being able to utilize it is well taken. I lived in the mountains of north Idaho for 8 years, from 1976 till 1984 and springtime Ground Squirrel hunting was a favorite pastime of a buddy and I. We shot a 500 round brick each per week during the practical season - just a few weeks when they came out of hibernation and before the grass grew too high to see them.

"MUCH" testing and fussing showed my 10/22 to definitely prefer the Remington Yellow Jackets (they were extremely effective on the Squirrels, too) and in actual, in the field shooting, the thing was deadly. I doubt I could shoot a 1" @ 100 yd with a full house match rifle, but any squirrel I caught in my old Weaver 2.5-7X (I think) oval scope was in very serious, deadly trouble. Shots were typically from ~20 - 50 yds.

My buddy and I were about equal in skill (I doubt either of us were competition grade) and we had quite a time of it, with much beer bet and enjoyed - when we got back to town.
 
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