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M9 custom, Ruger MK II work in progress, Rem. 700 in 7.62, winchester 290, remington 870
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
situation; someone came to me with heavily rusted and seized MK II and wanted to know what it would cost to make it serviceable and ready for sale. i gave my honest opinion that it would be cheaper to buy a new gun than what it would cost to restore it. they checked with a few other enthusiasts and two local gunsmiths that confirmed my opinion. they came back to me and asked if i wanted it for parts or for whatever. i said yes and decided to do the restoration myself more as a training point (i screw it up and i didnt pay a dime for the firearm, but i have a lot of new tools, or i work it properly and have a new gun and new tools, so win win)after two weeks of soaking in oil and gently working parts i was able to get the magazine out. another week or so after that i was able to disassemble it as completely as i can, there is one part in the upper that im not sure how or if i can remove, and i think i need to break down the mainspring housing, but i havnt done a lot with staked pins. so ill be doing some research on removing and replacing staked pins, but my main issue is medial blasting. from my research i think ive decided on using 120 grit aluminum oxide blasting media at 90 psi to remove the scaled rust and current finish. my plan it to de-grease with simple green for a major wipe down, then heated (120 degree or so) duracoat true strip. wipe down and then use clean true strip again (yes gloved for with whole procedure and contantly swapping to clean gloves) media blast, final de-grease, then a 7 to 8 second immersion in the duracoat black dip and then into a manganeze park pank thats properly seasoned. i will have the barrel rammed with silicon plugs, but i am curious should i do anything to the feed ramp to protect it at any point (like the media blast) same thing for the bolt itself. i have it fully broken down but i see some portions are finished and some are not. i am looking for solid advice on how to proceed. tomorrow evening i will be posting pictures of the current state of the firearm. im not a shutter bug and wish i had pics of it when i got it, but the best i can do is what i have now. any input, anecdotal or otherwise is appreciated, same with comments and criticism of my plans. but i am looking especially for similar instances. any help or advice will be greatly appreciated. thank you all!
 

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Sounds like a fun project. You might consider a baking soda media for any internal blasting. This will remove only rust and not damage the metal more than it already is.
Masking tape will protect your feed ramp from the media. Just don't concentrate the blast right on the tape. Maybe practice a little on a test piece. Usually media will simply bounce off the tape.
aluminum oxide will remove metal even at only 90psi. It will definitely round sharp edges if you concentrate on an area longer than needed. Den
 

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M9 custom, Ruger MK II work in progress, Rem. 700 in 7.62, winchester 290, remington 870
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do plan on playing with some test pieces before moving onto the firearm itself. As im looking to completely refinish the gun would you recommend a different pressure to work at to roughen the surface so the park can take? And ill check on the making soda media, thanks for the tip!
 

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M9 custom, Ruger MK II work in progress, Rem. 700 in 7.62, winchester 290, remington 870
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
photo_2021-04-20_19-42-04.jpg
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photo_2021-04-20_19-42-16.jpg
photo_2021-04-20_19-42-19.jpg
photo_2021-04-20_19-42-24.jpg
photo_2021-04-20_19-42-28.jpg

These are the major problem areas and have already had a lot of prep work done on them.
 

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M9 custom, Ruger MK II work in progress, Rem. 700 in 7.62, winchester 290, remington 870
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
15333

and this is the piece i was wondering if it could be removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
also i figured out the ejector removal and replacement if needed ( not planning on doing it because it sounds like a pain in butt and this thing is still well secured, and damage free. ill just clean it up and mask it off)
 

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Someone will chime in that knows your weapon really well.Just give them a few days to respond and you won't be disappointed.
Your weapon doesn't look that bad. I believe the finish is just black oxide (gun blue) and vinegar will.remove it. Just remember it will rust without a thin coat of oil.
I would be very careful using media on internal parts. For me that task is for a wire brush, sandpaper, and polishing compound.
I don't know what kind of media blaster you have so your best PSI will be up to your testing. Read the directions for your finish of choice. It might suggest how rough the surface should be. Your 120 will remove the rust and 90 may blend in the smaller rust pit damage. We used 90 for all the AK's and Uzi's we built back in the day and that was great for a parkerized finish.
If the project were mine I would start with the internals and if it shoots then I would finish the outside. With a lot of work all those pits can be filed and only you would know where they were. Key words"a lot of work". Denny
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i am fine with a lot of work. ive spent the night researching the model i have based on serial number and i can see that it is a blued finish. so i think i will be modifying my process. using something light, like glass beads at a low pressure or baking soda compounds (havnt researched that but i have 50 lbs of unused glass media here to play with some parts im replacing.) testing edges with different media and pressures. but ideally i see myself blasting off the rust with something light and soft, removing the finish with a mild acid like vinegar, spending time on the internals by hand and very light soda blasting, and then do a quick rough over of the exterior to accept the park finish. so i now have pushed my time table out. you have given me some outstanding advice and i appreciate it! as for the grit change, ill see about getting some 90 and tryting it out on my test pieces. alreadyt this project has cost me more than a new target MK IV so whats another few bucks! its at least 3 weeks before my last parts arrive for fitting and prep, so ive got plenty of time to wait and to experiment on scrap and stuff
 

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Hey, the pictures provided are a huge help. Now, before you start drifting those staked in-place pivot pins, consider what they do. If/when you remove the latch release pivot pin, all hell will break loose. The spring inside that mainspring housing assembly is very strong and will come out very quickly. Once it is out, think ahead about how you will get it back into the housing.
The rusting on the grip frame has gotten fairly deep and your plan for blasting with #120 grit is a good one and will get the rust out of the pits. Sanding the grip frame pitted area with progressively finer emery paper from #150 to #220 to #320 and then finish with #400 will help reduce the depth of the pits. Then, if you will be using Dura-Coat, consider that they also sell a product that will help fill whatever pitting is left before you do your final finish.
The ejector is staked in place, so I wouldn't recommend messing with that feature, unless you have the capability of re-staking that part properly. It looks to be OK, from this chair.
What does the bore look like? .22 rimfire barrels have a groove to land height of only 0.0020 to 0.0025 thousandths of an inch, so if there's any pitting in the bore, all you efforts may be waisted if the bore is really pitted.
Most of the pitting shown in your pictures does NOT look like it will affect function, now that you have it cleaned up some. If I were to do the work, I would sand the pitting away as far as you feel comfortable in doing. Doing that will not create any hazardous, or unsafe condition involving that pistol, and as I mentioned, my concern would be involved with the condition of the bore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One of the first things i did was inspect the bore to determine if it would be worth it and i was surprised that it was in good shape. Once i got it disassembled and basically cleaned and lubed it functions just fine, however i am looking for the experience of doing a refinish and this is a perfect opportunity. I am well aware of the power behind that mainspring and i have a little trick i do for anything that has that sort of pressure behind it. I have a thick plastic case for my punches that i use to catch any under pressure springs and detents.
15335

Haven't lost a spring in years! Getting it back in will be a bit tricky but i have a few ideas that im confidant will work, but thanks for the heads up. That was one of my concerns about disassembling it, but im confidant enough in my abilities to reassemble. As for the ejector i can definitly reinstall it if need be, but the ejector is well seated, theres nothing wrong with it, and its a "not broke dont fix it" scenario. Ive made a note of your advice for the sanding grits and all that and i will definitely follow! You have made this process a lot simpler with that advice, and i appreciate it.
 

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One of the first things i did was inspect the bore to determine if it would be worth it and i was surprised that it was in good shape. Once i got it disassembled and basically cleaned and lubed it functions just fine, however i am looking for the experience of doing a refinish and this is a perfect opportunity. I am well aware of the power behind that mainspring and i have a little trick i do for anything that has that sort of pressure behind it. I have a thick plastic case for my punches that i use to catch any under pressure springs and detents. View attachment 15335
Haven't lost a spring in years! Getting it back in will be a bit tricky but i have a few ideas that im confidant will work, but thanks for the heads up. That was one of my concerns about disassembling it, but im confidant enough in my abilities to reassemble. As for the ejector i can definitly reinstall it if need be, but the ejector is well seated, theres nothing wrong with it, and its a "not broke dont fix it" scenario. Ive made a note of your advice for the sanding grits and all that and i will definitely follow! You have made this process a lot simpler with that advice, and i appreciate it.
situation; someone came to me with heavily rusted and seized MK II and wanted to know what it would cost to make it serviceable and ready for sale. i gave my honest opinion that it would be cheaper to buy a new gun than what it would cost to restore it. they checked with a few other enthusiasts and two local gunsmiths that confirmed my opinion. they came back to me and asked if i wanted it for parts or for whatever. i said yes and decided to do the restoration myself more as a training point (i screw it up and i didnt pay a dime for the firearm, but i have a lot of new tools, or i work it properly and have a new gun and new tools, so win win)after two weeks of soaking in oil and gently working parts i was able to get the magazine out. another week or so after that i was able to disassemble it as completely as i can, there is one part in the upper that im not sure how or if i can remove, and i think i need to break down the mainspring housing, but i havnt done a lot with staked pins. so ill be doing some research on removing and replacing staked pins, but my main issue is medial blasting. from my research i think ive decided on using 120 grit aluminum oxide blasting media at 90 psi to remove the scaled rust and current finish. my plan it to de-grease with simple green for a major wipe down, then heated (120 degree or so) duracoat true strip. wipe down and then use clean true strip again (yes gloved for with whole procedure and contantly swapping to clean gloves) media blast, final de-grease, then a 7 to 8 second immersion in the duracoat black dip and then into a manganeze park pank thats properly seasoned. i will have the barrel rammed with silicon plugs, but i am curious should i do anything to the feed ramp to protect it at any point (like the media blast) same thing for the bolt itself. i have it fully broken down but i see some portions are finished and some are not. i am looking for solid advice on how to proceed. tomorrow evening i will be posting pictures of the current state of the firearm. im not a shutter bug and wish i had pics of it when i got it, but the best i can do is what i have now. any input, anecdotal or otherwise is appreciated, same with comments and criticism of my plans. but i am looking especially for similar instances. any help or advice will be greatly appreciated. thank you all!
I also found a very rusted Ruger. It was a functional standard model but had a mutilated muzzle and a lot of rust and pitting. I soaked it in Kroil to get it all Lucy goosey, and WD Specialist SOAK in a Pyrex dish removed all the bluing and rust. It's sidelined for now while I contemplate what to do with the muzzle. I looked at the snub nose post on this board with great interest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I also found a very rusted Ruger. It was a functional standard model but had a mutilated muzzle and a lot of rust and pitting. I soaked it in Kroil to get it all Lucy goosey, and WD Specialist SOAK in a Pyrex dish removed all the bluing and rust. It's sidelined for now while I contemplate what to do with the muzzle. I looked at the snub nose post on this board with great interest.
I saw that. not my thing but it was an interesting story. But removing the bluing chemically will make for an easier time roughing the finish prior to parkerizing. thankfully for me though theres not much wrong with the barrel so i can leave that mostly as is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey, the pictures provided are a huge help. Now, before you start drifting those staked in-place pivot pins, consider what they do. If/when you remove the latch release pivot pin, all hell will break loose. The spring inside that mainspring housing assembly is very strong and will come out very quickly. Once it is out, think ahead about how you will get it back into the housing.
The rusting on the grip frame has gotten fairly deep and your plan for blasting with #120 grit is a good one and will get the rust out of the pits. Sanding the grip frame pitted area with progressively finer emery paper from #150 to #220 to #320 and then finish with #400 will help reduce the depth of the pits. Then, if you will be using Dura-Coat, consider that they also sell a product that will help fill whatever pitting is left before you do your final finish.
The ejector is staked in place, so I wouldn't recommend messing with that feature, unless you have the capability of re-staking that part properly. It looks to be OK, from this chair.
What does the bore look like? .22 rimfire barrels have a groove to land height of only 0.0020 to 0.0025 thousandths of an inch, so if there's any pitting in the bore, all you efforts may be waisted if the bore is really pitted.
Most of the pitting shown in your pictures does NOT look like it will affect function, now that you have it cleaned up some. If I were to do the work, I would sand the pitting away as far as you feel comfortable in doing. Doing that will not create any hazardous, or unsafe condition involving that pistol, and as I mentioned, my concern would be involved with the condition of the bore.
Oh and i looked up the filler you were talking about. It doesnt look like that will work for me as it it wont take the park. It will take the pray on finishes and the park replicator, but i am going to using an actual parkerizing solution and doing the whole nine yards. So there may be blemishes on the firearm, but it will be a nice story to tell at the range and to the kids. But thanks for pointing it out, if i decide to do some sort of coating on other firearms in the future i now know this is an option for minor repairs.
 
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