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Every time I have to install the take down pin. I don't know what the trick is to push the spring down enough to get the pin past the spring. I eventually do it but it's got to be easier than what I go through. Tonight I finally gave up trying to insert the pin with the slide on the frame, removed the slide and fiddled with the pin until I got it past the spring and then slipped on the frame and pushed the pin in place. Any secrets as to how to do this with less drama?
 

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I don't know why you are having so much of a problem with that operation which has always been very easy for me. Just push the slide back very slightly. Look in the hole where the pin goes and you can see when you have it lined up right, just a slight backwards push on the slide does it. Then hold the slide in that position and the pin should go in with just a little push of your fingers. Just maneuver the pin in until it is all the way in and then release the slide. It shouldn't be any problem at all. It's not like putting back together a Ruger Mk III or something - Aargh! That one gives me nightmares! PS Don't oil the pin.
 

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Bowzette, the manual states just about exactly what was described by "W". There's an easy way to push the slide back the 1/4 inch or so that's needed to provide clearance for the takedown pin installation. Hopefully this description will make sense and maybe somebody can find a video showing the procedure.

With the slide in battery, the takedown pin is held rather tightly. To remove the takedown pin AND to install the takedown pin, the slide needs to be pushed back about 1/4 inch and held there while you remove or install the takedown pin.

An easy way that I use to push and hold the slide back with one hand (my left hand) is:
  • MAKE SURE THE PISTOL IS CLEAR OF ANY AMMUNITION
  • With the right hand, hold the LCP as if you are going to shoot it and point the muzzle to the left.
  • Insert the left forefinger through the trigger guard from the opposite side (the pistol's right side) and wrap it around the trigger guard towards you.
  • Put your left thumb on the muzzle of the barrel.
  • You may want to use one of your extra left-hand fingers under the LCP's grip so you can easily hold the LCP and push the slide all with the left hand.
  • Now, you can remove your right hand from the LCP and completely support the LCP with your left hand.
  • Apply pressure with the left thumb to move the slide rearward about 1/4 inch while holding the frame with the finger that's through the trigger guard.

While holding the LCP in this way with the left hand (with the slide to the rear 1/4"), you can either remove or reinstall the takedown pin.


ADDITIONAL: "W" suggested avoiding lubrication of the takedown pin. This, in my opinion, is wrong. The takedown pin should be lubricated because it slides against the barrel locking system under significant pressure and also the takedown pin should be able to rotate within the frame if it needs to. Thus, the entire length of the takedown pin should be lubricated with a high quality firearms oil such as the Slip 2000 that I use.
 

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Thanks, Skip. I had heard that the takedown pin was supposed to be lubricated. I was about to ask if that was the case after reading w's post but I'm sure you're right. The pin should be lubricated.
 

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For the life of me, I cannot insert that pin - being naturally left-handed. I have never succeeded doing so. But whenever I try (off) right-handed, it goes in without struggle.

Is that bizarre - or what?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks. I know it isn't difficult-except for me! Maybe I haven't been moving the slide sufficiently. I do lightly lube the pin.
 

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This is what wives are for, bowzette. Threading needles for millennia has given them a leg up on the male of the species. If you've got one, let her give it a try . . . especially if she's right-handed.
 

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ADDITIONAL: "W" suggested avoiding lubrication of the takedown pin. This, in my opinion, is wrong. The takedown pin should be lubricated because it slides against the barrel locking system under significant pressure and also the takedown pin should be able to rotate within the frame if it needs to. Thus, the entire length of the takedown pin should be lubricated with a high quality firearms oil such as the Slip 2000 that I use.

Well, I never lubricate the pin and I never had any problem with it such as I see others having, like it working its way out on its own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is what wives are for, bowzette. Threading needles for millennia has given them a leg up on the male of the species. If you've got one, let her give it a try . . . especially if she's right-handed.
bld522 I get in plenty of trouble on my own-don't need any help:chuncky: But you are correct. She would lip it in without a problem and give me the wife of "Tim the Tool Man" look.
 

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Well, I never lubricate the pin and I never had any problem with it such as I see others having, like it working its way out on its own.
I lubricate the takedown pin in my LCP and it's never walked out of place to the best of my recollection.

I want my takedown pin to do its job without wearing out thus I lubricate it. The pin should be able to rotate in its mounting holes and I don't want the contact with the barrel's lockup ramp to wear or damage the pin either.
 

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I lubricate the takedown pin in my LCP and it's never walked out of place to the best of my recollection.
Any ideas on why some have that problem? Were some defective? I don't think the instruction manual shows the takedown pin as a lube point.
 

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Any ideas on why some have that problem? Were some defective? I don't think the instruction manual shows the takedown pin as a lube point.
Sometimes the hairpin spring that holds the takedown pin in place (by forcing itself into the groove near the left end of the pin) breaks or isn't strong enough to hold the pin in place under the rather violent recoil. There may also be some slight mis-location of the holes in the frame & sub-frame in a few pistols that could contribute to the situation. I don't have any feedback from Ruger about this, but my ideas are based on reports of the situation I've read in forums like this one and a bit of studying about how the LCP is designed.
 

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bld522 I get in plenty of trouble on my own-don't need any help:chuncky: But you are correct. She would lip it in without a problem and give me the wife of "Tim the Tool Man" look.
Ah, well that's what division of labor is all about. My wife is much more mechanical than I am. So she wears the tool belt. I, on the other hand, am much better than she is with electronics. So I maintain the computers, A/V equipment, etc. It's still working after 42 years of marriage. :thumbsup:
 

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I too find it to be the only PITA part of taking down and cleaning the LCP. It's just never a completely smooth part of the process. One thing that seems to help is I try starting mine in at about a 30 degree angle up and wiggle it until it starts to slide in. At some point it practically falls in. I wipe mine with Remoil. It's always dirty and it's left fairly lubed when inserted. 900 rounds, it's never 'walked' out at all that I can recall.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Sometimes the hairpin spring that holds the takedown pin in place (by forcing itself into the groove near the left end of the pin) breaks or isn't strong enough to hold the pin in place under the rather violent recoil. There may also be some slight mis-location of the holes in the frame & sub-frame in a few pistols that could contribute to the situation. I don't have any feedback from Ruger about this, but my ideas are based on reports of the situation I've read in forums like this one and a bit of studying about how the LCP is designed.
Skip, I think you are exactly right. I have had 2 LCP replaced by Ruger because of take down pins. From what I've seen and heard from Ruger, the problem is either the spring or something out of spec, eg. the holes not properly lining up. As a result, the stress on the pin causes one of the holes to become out of round and the pin wobbles and moves out. Typically, the hole on the right side will begin to show signs of wear or even a bur. The frame insert is aluminum and the pin is steel.
 

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Thanks, Skip. I had heard that the takedown pin was supposed to be lubricated. I was about to ask if that was the case after reading w's post but I'm sure you're right. The pin should be lubricated.
Thanks is due to all of you. I was going nuts, new lcp 22 on reinserting the pin. I tried your suggestions and added a new twist. First I lubed the pin. Then I oiled the spring and worked it up and down about 20 times. Then I removed the frame and started the pin, put the frame back on, moved the frame a tad and boom in it went.
 
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