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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My new LCP II 380 had this problem for the first 200 rounds. Anybody else? I find old posts on this, but not any recent ones.

First I checked the feed ramp, it was well polished from the factory.
Then the mags, ordered 2 more, no change, it's not the mag, bummer.
Then on a lark, and one obscure internet post, I checked the breech face.

Horrified, I found that the breech face was very rough, and dirty, shame on me.

So I very lightly polished the breech face - dremel felt tip and flitz polish for like 5 seconds at lowish speeds - it still looks pretty rough, no attempt at a mirror shine, I was worried I would change specs as guns have pretty tight tolerances. I also I clean (much better) and oil/grease (very lightly) the breech face as part of my routine. I haven't had any failures since. I also switched from just oil, to a mix of oil and grease (MilCom synthetic stuff) on the slide rails (and on the breech face), anything to make it load a round easier. The grease (overkill on the amount of grease on the rails), made that slide move noticeably easier, like it was buttered (which it was, full synthetic butter from MilCom...).

Maybe the gun finished breaking in, or maybe those things fixed it. Truth be told I didn't know a dirty/rough breech face could cause problems, or that lubing it was important, or that grease could help a recalcitrant slide that much. I am still learning to do this properly.
 

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My new LCP II 380 had this problem for the first 200 rounds. Anybody else? I find old posts on this, but not any recent ones.

First I checked the feed ramp, it was well polished from the factory.
Then the mags, ordered 2 more, no change, it's not the mag, bummer.
Then on a lark, and one obscure internet post, I checked the breech face.

Horrified, I found that the breech face was very rough, and dirty, shame on me.

So I very lightly polished the breech face - dremel felt tip and flitz polish for like 5 seconds at lowish speeds - it still looks pretty rough, no attempt at a mirror shine, I was worried I would change specs as guns have pretty tight tolerances. I also I clean (much better) and oil/grease (very lightly) the breech face as part of my routine. I haven't had any failures since. I also switched from just oil, to a mix of oil and grease (MilCom synthetic stuff) on the slide rails (and on the breech face), anything to make it load a round easier. The grease (overkill on the amount of grease on the rails), made that slide move noticeably easier, like it was buttered (which it was, full synthetic butter from MilCom...).

Maybe the gun finished breaking in, or maybe those things fixed it. Truth be told I didn't know a dirty/rough breech face could cause problems, or that lubing it was important, or that grease could help a recalcitrant slide that much. I am still learning to do this properly.
My new LCP II 380 had this problem for the first 200 rounds. Anybody else? I find old posts on this, but not any recent ones.

First I checked the feed ramp, it was well polished from the factory.
Then the mags, ordered 2 more, no change, it's not the mag, bummer.
Then on a lark, and one obscure internet post, I checked the breech face.

Horrified, I found that the breech face was very rough, and dirty, shame on me.

So I very lightly polished the breech face - dremel felt tip and flitz polish for like 5 seconds at lowish speeds - it still looks pretty rough, no attempt at a mirror shine, I was worried I would change specs as guns have pretty tight tolerances. I also I clean (much better) and oil/grease (very lightly) the breech face as part of my routine. I haven't had any failures since. I also switched from just oil, to a mix of oil and grease (MilCom synthetic stuff) on the slide rails (and on the breech face), anything to make it load a round easier. The grease (overkill on the amount of grease on the rails), made that slide move noticeably easier, like it was buttered (which it was, full synthetic butter from MilCom...).

Maybe the gun finished breaking in, or maybe those things fixed it. Truth be told I didn't know a dirty/rough breech face could cause problems, or that lubing it was important, or that grease could help a recalcitrant slide that much. I am still learning to do this properly.
It would've been nice to see pictures of your slides breech face and then after you worked that area. I like and use Flitz, but only as a very final end result. It doesn't remove very much metal, as you found out.
I fell, it's always a good idea to lube/grease slide rails, to some extent. Too much grease won't hurt it just makes things a little bit more messy. I much prefer an anti-seize product that has copper dust impregnated in it, as the copper dust is also a sort of lubricating method. Reads to me like you have your pistol where you want it to be now.
 

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Post a clear picture if the slide face is that rough the only thing Flitz is going to do is make a rough surface shiny. A fine oil stone or 600 to 800 grit paper will be needed. That being said being a new gun send it back to Ruger. I am taking for granted you are using factory brass case ammo not reloads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, here is the breech face, I think I captured it pretty well. That's after polishing and with oil/grease on the face. While Flitz may not remove the gross imperfections, it will make things slide over them easier.
20210721_113731_crop.jpg
 

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I would smooth that out with a fine India stone and follow up with a fine Ruby stone. But I am a retired Tool and Die Maker and have done that work before.
The slide face looks like the broach was over due to be changed.
Call Ruger and get a return ticket then send it back this is a new gun they made it let them make it right. Most likely they will replace the slide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am guessing a broach is a machining tool used to make the slide, and they just messed this one up? I am also guessing that getting an india/ruby stone into that tight area would be hard, as the face isn't removable, it's cut into the metal. leaving dremel-type tools as the only option. I'll send that pic to Ruger customer support and see what they think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I sent them the pic, and they said if the gun is shooting ok best not to worry about it. I think I'm good with that, I may do some more flitz-work on it just to push out any possibility of failure.
 

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I am guessing a broach is a machining tool used to make the slide, and they just messed this one up? I am also guessing that getting an india/ruby stone into that tight area would be hard, as the face isn't removable, it's cut into the metal. leaving dremel-type tools as the only option. I'll send that pic to Ruger customer support and see what they think.
Yes. a push or pull broach is actually a cutting tool with progressively cutting teeth, and in the picture you posted, I agree, it needs to be sharpened, or replaced with a much freer cutting, sharper version.
You picture shows much more clearly your dilemma. As was mentioned, Ruger should get the chance to see that slide.
The firing pin hole also looks like metal smear from the dull broach has caused an elliptical condition that just might impede the forward travel of the firing pin. Did you notice any light primer hits?
 
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