Ruger Pistol Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I ran outta 'yarn' , so I thought maybe this question could stir up some activity from those who actually DO-HAVE some sort of "muzzle flip arresting gizmo" that they have in use on their .22 caliber rimfire pistols.

Some of the 'experts' vehemently claim that any device stuck onto a .22 rimfire pistol muzzle, with the intent to eliminate ANY, amount of muzzle flip, involved when shooting these pistols is a waste of $$$ and effort.

Hmmmmm!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
Not an expert but I've given several of the muzzle devices a try. Weather or not they actually reduced any muzzle flip is is in my opinion minimal. What I have noticed is that the steel ones have given my 22/45 LITE more stability with the weight out front. I've watched videos and read all the hype and drivel about how much flip is reduced compared to without a device, but they are not taking into account that added weight. A good real comparison would be nice along with the use of a sound meter because some designs are much louder than need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Never had the need for a muzzle brake on my.22 Pistols just a big waste of money just learn to shoot accurately, my advice is to invest the money in ammo for target shooting.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bgoff689

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well, I can't even begin to think of myself as being an "expert" on reducing what muzzle flip there is involved with a Ruger Mark II .22 Long Rifle chambered pistol, but I have experimented with what can work and what does work for my "test pistol". As far as any "nay-sayers" are concerned, they prove NOTHING to say that the gasses produced from a .22 rimfire bullet, when redirected properly, WILL NOT help to reduce some of the muzzle flip that's present. To claim there is no muzzle flip, only involves, those claimers, and their lack of doing any proper testing process.
Added weight? Not in this procedure, far from it! I actually cut off part of the barrel off so that the brake could be threaded in place with a "gas collection chamber" which made the added on metal lighter than the section that was cut off. So, what else you got?
If I remember correctly, at one time you were a huge proponent of the alleged muzzle brake that TandemKross had made for them, not too long ago. But then you do CLAIM that you've read it ALL, so then you must be an expert on what the interweb says. But it could also involve you using several inferiorly produced muzzle brakes. Right? Muzzle brakes with holes completely encircling their periphery, will NEVER work, how can they when the ports counteract one another. Use your head.
There is no absolute proof that the muzzle brake they (TK) buys, and then renames, and sells, has ever been tested and proven, to see how well it works. The brake on my pistol, that I've developed after testing many others and learned, has indeed been tested and proven that a .22 Long Rifle round does indeed produce enough gas, and from MY testing does help reduce muzzle flip to an extent. To an extent where I can actually get on the next sequential target more quicker than when that brake was not installed. How do I KNOW that? By my timed scores Francis, that's how. :p

Here's what happened to one wrap of painters tape over three rows of "properly aligned and sized, exit ports" on my brake:


Next attempt involved four (4) layers of painters tape and one CCI Mini-Mag round:

So then further testing involved a thicker material involving a playing card:

And four (4) wraps of painters tape:

Another CCI Mini-Mag was fired, and the exiting gasses from that round, blew the card and tape off the brake:


It bothers me not one iota that some will remain obstinate in their "false beliefs" that when a properly sized gas collection chamber, has properly arranged exit ports, of the properly sized diameters that it doesn't direct escaping gas, whatever amount there is, in a beneficially directed manner to reduce muzzle flip. I know that it works for me and there's NOBODY here, who can prove otherwise. At least I don't see any self-proclaimed "reviewers" doing an actual review showing it NOT to work. Maybe they just haven't found an actual review to copy off the interweb as yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I'm curious to read about any other members here, or those who just visit to read about things posted, if they have another, 'sensible reason" as why and how, the covering over the exit ports on this compensater have been burned and blown off. If it's NOT what I claim it is, expanding gasses being directed upward, please inform those here what happened to that tape and playing card.
I did have some pictures of shooting this pistol with the very same ammunition a while after dusk, and it gets pretty darn dark after dusk around here, but they just show some fire jetting up from the muzzle brake and the compensater is just not that well defined.

Sound levels among various brakes? I don't know where many of the folks around here shoot, or what any of the "shooting matches are held" require, but of all those I've been to, eye and ear protection are mandatory wearing requirements. And even if they were NOT, I would still have my ears covered with my Pelter electronic muffs that shut completely OFF when noise is detected above a safe decibel level so that no ill effects are inflicted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The steel ones do dampen muzzle flip a bit. That said steel or alumnimun work just like their centerfire relitives.The higher the velocity and more gas pressure the better they work. CCI standered velocity is bearley noticable stingers and volcitor show the most muzzle dampening.
I am to old and slow for the few tenths of a secound they save on a shot string. When the teenagers shoot the same stage in 1/2 the time or less no amount of practice will help that much.
The only time I use a comp on a rimfire is on a rifle. They increase the report the timer needs to record the shoots
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Many of the "alleged" muzzle brakes that I've seen already prove that they're a failure by their design, just looking at 'em. Especially those brakes that have huge slots along the sides of the brake. Burning cartridge gasses need to be constricted so they jet out in a manner that opposes the natural muzzle flip involved with shooting ANY pistol round. My analogy involves the same manner as how a garden hose works and those that are equipped with a flow constricting nozzle.

Turn the water feed on when the hose has no nozzle, just a straight-through departure for the water. The water just sorta dribbles out of the hose without much, if any force. When a nozzle is added to the front end of the hose and has the capability of being turned to reduce the exit diameter of the hose, the smaller diameter begins to cause the water to come out at a more constricted exit, with higher pressure.
So that's why it's important to have a collection chamber where how much ever gasses are available and expanding as they are collected, temporarily, and then find that they can only vent upward and at 45° angles on each side of TDC through small holes that require the gasses to escape with much more force. So, that's the theory that's been proven with my compensator design.

It doesn't matter to me what a person chooses to use, and/or feels comfortable with, and I shoot in the age categories that I have available for my age when shoots have categories for seniors. There are also various equipment classes that shooters are grouped in when they present the caliber and style of pistol involved.
I just LOVE to see when older gentlemen like myself have a compensater with holes all around the O.D. , or with wide slots at the sides of the comp that rob away the benefit of a better effective "brake" having rows of proper diameter exit vents that make escaping gasses help a shooter get shorter "time-scores" that make them a winner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Many of the "alleged" muzzle brakes that I've seen already prove that they're a failure by their design, just looking at 'em. Especially those brakes that have huge slots along the sides of the brake. Burning cartridge gasses need to be constricted so they jet out in a manner that opposes the natural muzzle flip involved with shooting ANY pistol round. My analogy involves the same manner as how a garden hose works and those that are equipped with a flow constricting nozzle.

Turn the water feed on when the hose has no nozzle, just a straight-through departure for the water. The water just sorta dribbles out of the hose without much, if any force. When a nozzle is added to the front end of the hose and has the capability of being turned to reduce the exit diameter of the hose, the smaller diameter begins to cause the water to come out at a more constricted exit, with higher pressure.
So that's why it's important to have a collection chamber where how much ever gasses are available and expanding as they are collected, temporarily, and then find that they can only vent upward and at 45° angles on each side of TDC through small holes that require the gasses to escape with much more force. So, that's the theory that's been proven with my compensator design.

It doesn't matter to me what a person chooses to use, and/or feels comfortable with, and I shoot in the age categories that I have available for my age when shoots have categories for seniors. There are also various equipment classes that shooters are grouped in when they present the caliber and style of pistol involved.
I just LOVE to see when older gentlemen like myself have a compensater with holes all around the O.D. , or with wide slots at the sides of the comp that rob away the benefit of a better effective "brake" having rows of proper diameter exit vents that make escaping gasses help a shooter get shorter "time-scores" that make them a winner.
Many years ago I was in marksmanship and there was a timed course shooting 5 targets with each 5 shot string getting shorter down to 2 sec . Best I can remember they were S&W pistols firing 22 shorts and had angled slits near the muzzle . These angled slits held the muzzle down and moved you sideways to the next target . They worked !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Many years ago I was in marksmanship and there was a timed course shooting 5 targets with each 5 shot string getting shorter down to 2 sec . Best I can remember they were S&W pistols firing 22 shorts and had angled slits near the muzzle. These angled slits held the muzzle down and moved you sideways to the next target . They worked !
40 years ago I shot a .22 Hi-Standard & S&W Mdl 41 in the U.S.ARMY AMTU Pistol Competition, as well as the 1911 .45 ACP, and not one of them had a muzzle brake on them. These all were competition pistols. I think on a .22 LR they are a waste of money unless you are shooting in. a 22lr pistol competition. On the larger calibers, they do in fact reduce muzzle flip.
 
  • Like
Reactions: oldntrd

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If I ever learn how to use my phone to make movies, I'd like to record shooting the above pistol with a magazine full of CCI Mini-Mags a bit after dusk, and it gets really dark out. The fire jetting up out of this compensater is quite the show.
It's pretty much a given, and should be understandable that the higher pressure causing the bullet to get out of the muzzle faster will help counter-act muzzle flip when directed in the proper manner. Must be why the .38 Super cartridge works so darn well with compensators affixed...eh?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
A Comp makes a big diffrance on a 38 super. That reminds me to dig mine out of the safe and shoot it again. Want to get some good muzzle flash pictures in bright sun light try a 50 Beowulf with an 18 inch barrel.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A compensator on ANY .38 Super chambered semi-auto does indeed make for quicker muzzle recovery and that's been proven over and over again.
My post was geared more toward how a .22 rimfire semi-auto can benefit from the gasses involved with .22 Long Rifle ammunition when a properly made compensator is involved, that many of the "nay-sayers", who only parrot information posted and passed along by those who've never had the good fortune to try using a GOOD one.
The .38 Super with a muzzle compensator is a good example that proves the compensator works for its intended purpose, but so does a well designed compensator for .22 pistols. Haven't seen any posts so far that prove otherwise, only posts that involved how poorly made compensators by those who don't know what they're doing, fail.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top