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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need recommendations for a red dot sight to install on the MK IV.

I don't want to spend huge money for top of the line but want to know which sight is the most bang for the money.

Also, green or red dot and why. Either color better for certain situations?
 

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to the forum. I have several of the Ultra-Dot red dots on four of my Ruger Mark pistols and a few others. They have a Life-Time warranty, and depending on what you consider to be reasonable in price, they are that:



The dot provides only one feature to place on your target, whether it be paper, steel or furry, and hits come often.


 

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The Ultra Dot is a great system but I went with the C-More Railway. It has dots available from 2 - 16 MOA. I use 3 for accuracy testing and 12 MOA for Steel Challenge.

It's a lot cheaper than Ultra Dots, fits your Weaver or Picatinny mount and holds zero very well. Proof of it's reliability is that it rules in USPSA Open Division.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice pistol collection.
to the forum. I have several of the Ultra-Dot red dots on four of my Ruger Mark pistols and a few others. They have a Life-Time warranty, and depending on what you consider to be reasonable in price, they are that:



The dot provides only one feature to place on your target, whether it be paper, steel or furry, and hits come often.


Nice collection of pistols.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·


The Ultra Dot is a great system but I went with the C-More Railway. It has dots available from 2 - 16 MOA. I use 3 for accuracy testing and 12 MOA for Steel Challenge.

It's a lot cheaper than Ultra Dots, fits your Weaver or Picatinny mount and holds zero very well. Proof of it's reliability is that it rules in USPSA Open Division.
Nice pistol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What do you get for spending more on a red dot?

Whats the advantage to spending more money?

I see red dots starting at $90 up to $500. I want to know what you get for more money?
 

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What do you get for spending more on a red dot?

Whats the advantage to spending more money?

I see red dots starting at $90 up to $500. I want to know what you get for more money?
Darn good question. Wish I had an answer for you , but I don't. I bought my first Ultra-Dot over 20 years ago, and it still does what I need, so I've bought more. If it was a POS, I'd certainly post that in my "BLOG", but these sights work great and the battery lasts quite some time, if you don't forget to turn it off when you're done shootin'. Don't ask me how I know that, but I now keep an extra battery in my range bag. 🥺

I just can't understand why even rifle scopes have gotten into the "thousands of dollar" range over the last several years, when there are very good Leupold scopes out there that cost much less and perform just fine. And don't even get me started on scope rings that cost $150.00 and up. It's NUTS.
 

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I'm certainly not an expert, but am quite knowledgeable about firearms and shooting in general after a long lifetime of messing about with them. My eyes are deteriorating now and having serious trouble with standard iron sights. I fell in love with a Ruger Mk IV Target last year so did some research on the red dot sights and, like you, couldn't figure why the huge range of prices.

1st I ordered a very cheap mini-scope that looks like a standard but shortened regular scope sight. That thing had such bad parallax (??) that I could prop the pistol up on a rest, sit down behind it, move my head and watch the red dot wander around on the target. Got rid of that thing.

Next I tried the compact, less than 1" long "window" type and found one with good reviews - the Browning Buckmark, IIRC - and price was moderate, around $50 or $60, I think. It works extremely well and I loved it, but had problems....

1) Shooting outside on a bright day (almost all days are bright in New Mexico) I had serious trouble picking up the red dot against the glare. Once I'd found it, usually by looking into shade, finding it, then carefully moving the pistol around to where I could see the target, I was deadly. Among others, I have a 10" gong with a 3" round cutout in the middle that has a separate small steel gong behind it. At 10 yards, I almost couldn't miss. Put the red dot on the target and it was easy, even with my eyes. Fairly rapid fire, that 3" center gong jumped with almost every shot. Loved it.

2) The kicker that spoiled it for me = The line of sight thru the red dot is more than 2" above the line of the pistol's bore. Shooting at handgun ranges, that equates to a pretty extreme angle. When shooting at 7 yards, the bullet is rising quickly to meet the line of sight. Fine and dandy. BUT.....

Switch to a target 10 yards away and couldn't hit it. Careful work with paper targets showed me that it was shooting over 3" high at 10 yards - that bullet path is far above line of sight by then. At 15 - 20 yards or more, forget it. Might as well throw rocks.

If you have the skill to instantly correctly judge distance to within a foot or so and a good enuf computer between your ears to instantly figure compensation at varying ranges, then go for it.....you'll love it. I can highly recommend the Browning Buckmark.

On mine...??....I pulled the red dot off'n it and installed fiber optic sights. Not as easy to use and not nearly as accurate for me, but it shoots where I'm aiming without fussing over it.
 

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gogittum:
Try sighting in at 7 yards again but make your shots hit 1 1/2 inches low. This will get your on target at 10 and will work well at 15, 25 and even 35 yards. This is what I do with my guns when setting them up for Steel Challenge Competitions.

Do the initial sight in but then verify for yourself that you are going to hit the required targets as they get further away.
 

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Need recommendations for a red dot sight to install on the MK IV.

I don't want to spend huge money for top of the line but want to know which sight is the most bang for the money.

Also, green or red dot and why. Either color better for certain situations?
I have a Burris Fast Fire II on both of my 22/45 lites!
White Air gun Trigger Wood Mammal
Air gun Trigger Line Gun barrel Wood
 

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I'm certainly not an expert, but am quite knowledgeable about firearms and shooting in general after a long lifetime of messing about with them. My eyes are deteriorating now and having serious trouble with standard iron sights. I fell in love with a Ruger Mk IV Target last year so did some research on the red dot sights and, like you, couldn't figure why the huge range of prices.

1st I ordered a very cheap mini-scope that looks like a standard but shortened regular scope sight. That thing had such bad parallax (??) that I could prop the pistol up on a rest, sit down behind it, move my head and watch the red dot wander around on the target. Got rid of that thing.

Next I tried the compact, less than 1" long "window" type and found one with good reviews - the Browning Buckmark, IIRC - and price was moderate, around $50 or $60, I think. It works extremely well and I loved it, but had problems....

1) Shooting outside on a bright day (almost all days are bright in New Mexico) I had serious trouble picking up the red dot against the glare. Once I'd found it, usually by looking into shade, finding it, then carefully moving the pistol around to where I could see the target, I was deadly. Among others, I have a 10" gong with a 3" round cutout in the middle that has a separate small steel gong behind it. At 10 yards, I almost couldn't miss. Put the red dot on the target and it was easy, even with my eyes. Fairly rapid fire, that 3" center gong jumped with almost every shot. Loved it.

2) The kicker that spoiled it for me = The line of sight thru the red dot is more than 2" above the line of the pistol's bore. Shooting at handgun ranges, that equates to a pretty extreme angle. When shooting at 7 yards, the bullet is rising quickly to meet the line of sight. Fine and dandy. BUT.....

Switch to a target 10 yards away and couldn't hit it. Careful work with paper targets showed me that it was shooting over 3" high at 10 yards - that bullet path is far above line of sight by then. At 15 - 20 yards or more, forget it. Might as well throw rocks.

If you have the skill to instantly correctly judge distance to within a foot or so and a good enuf computer between your ears to instantly figure compensation at varying ranges, then go for it.....you'll love it. I can highly recommend the Browning Buckmark.

On mine...??....I pulled the red dot off'n it and installed fiber optic sights. Not as easy to use and not nearly as accurate for me, but it shoots where I'm aiming without fussing over it.
i use a Burris Fast FIre II, and it works well.
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory
 

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gogittum:
Try sighting in at 7 yards again but make your shots hit 1 1/2 inches low. This will get your on target at 10 and will work well at 15, 25 and even 35 yards. This is what I do with my guns when setting them up for Steel Challenge Competitions.

Do the initial sight in but then verify for yourself that you are going to hit the required targets as they get further away.
Yes, you must pick an intermediate distance such as 7-10 yrds, then shoot at 5 yd increments out to say 25 and note the change in impact. It is not perfect, but you will get hits.
 

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What do you get for spending more on a red dot?

Whats the advantage to spending more money?

I see red dots starting at $90 up to $500. I want to know what you get for more money?
What you get is "quality" of manufacture and rugged construction that will hold up to more strenuous activity(abuse) . Like a good watch. You do not buy a Rolex to just tell time, a Timex can do that. You buy it to last a lifetime and be able to handle anything that comes your way in life. I own both and for pure time keeping they both work fine. If I am going some place that will have lousy weather, perhaps rugged condition, off the beaten track etc...yup, take the Rolex. Same goes for the red dot. The cheap ones usually work fine, for awhile, sometimes longer, but often times not. The better ones can take the abuse from hard use etc. That being said, you can get a good, solid red dot from a good maker for 200-300 now. Sig makes some good ones as does Holosun, Burris, Springfield Armory, Vortex and others to name a few.
 

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Darn good question. Wish I had an answer for you , but I don't. I bought my first Ultra-Dot over 20 years ago, and it still does what I need, so I've bought more. If it was a POS, I'd certainly post that in my "BLOG", but these sights work great and the battery lasts quite some time, if you don't forget to turn it off when you're done shootin'. Don't ask me how I know that, but I now keep an extra battery in my range bag. 🥺

I just can't understand why even rifle scopes have gotten into the "thousands of dollar" range over the last several years, when there are very good Leupold scopes out there that cost much less and perform just fine. And don't even get me started on scope rings that cost $150.00 and up. It's NUTS.
Depends on what you are using it for? If you are doing "normal" hunting target shooting etc within reasonable ranges, the basic scopes work fine. When you start stretching the distance to lon-g-g-g-g-g yardage then, the higher end scope quality of glass starts to make a difference in better clarity edge to edge, color rendition, features like Zero stops and Horus reticles, and ability to absorb rough handling etc...that is where the money starts to add up. I have Leupold VXII scopes that are 20 yrs old on some of my rifles and they work fine for what I need,and I also have Leupold Mark 4'scopes rings and bases on two Rem Police customs by Badger, but if I was going on the hunt of a life time, etc where i would have only one time, one shot to make it all happen, I would upgrade to a Mark 6.
 

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gogittum:
Try sighting in at 7 yards again but make your shots hit 1 1/2 inches low. This will get your on target at 10 and will work well at 15, 25 and even 35 yards. This is what I do with my guns when setting them up for Steel Challenge Competitions.

Do the initial sight in but then verify for yourself that you are going to hit the required targets as they get further away.
Well, dohhhh.....?? That's exactly what I do with my rifle scopes. Wonder why it didn't occur to me for the pistol as well ?? Old age creepeth up, I guess. Thanks.
 

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Well, dohhhh.....?? That's exactly what I do with my rifle scopes. Wonder why it didn't occur to me for the pistol as well ?? Old age creepeth up, I guess. Thanks.
LOL, yes I have many "senior" moments and all you can do is laugh, because you sure as hejj cant change it!!!
 

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The initial, original, question from the OP involved a "red-dot" sight for his Mark IV, which is a pistol. Somehow the thread morphed into what can be used for a rifle or long range shooting. All together different sort of need involved, that experienced "hunters" should understand.
Red-dot sights are not designed for long range shooting, for example, on a bolt action rifle in ..280 Remington caliber, because red-dots don't have any "magnification" involved, and are mainly for close range sequential target acquisition use and not long range accuracy.
Hard to imagine anyone using a red-dot scope for antelope or prairie dog shooting, at least for the many times I've done that sort of shooting, one is better off with a rifle. Yet, I suppose there are some who try that sort of thing, but I much prefer a variable Zeiss scope that has an adjustment range going up to 14x. 👍
 

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My Vortex Venoms work well for me.

 

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Both the Viper and the Venom are high-end, premium red dot sights that will do a fantastic job at their intended tasks. The Viper has a 6 MOA dot and is all-around more designed for handgun shooting at less than 25 yards, and up to 50 yards in a pinch. The Venom has a 3 MOA dot and is designed for rifle shooting from 25 to 100 yards, though the dot will be smaller than necessary at distances less than 50 yards.

This article is outdated and should be removed due to errors.

My Venom has a 6 MOA dot and is adjustable for ten brightness levels (allows you to fine tune the apparent size of the dot) has an auto shutoff and is parallax free.

Works great for rifle or pistol and allows fast target acquisition and more precision than other red dots.

The aforementioned "Ultra-Dot" has the dubious advantage of being large, heavy, clunky, cheap and has poor battery life.......so the Vortex is a better choice for most people.
 
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