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The new spring is almost 50% stronger than the OEM. That means the slide will now slam harder forward. I would be concerned about possible damage.
With all due respect, there’s no way the inertia of a slide pushed by a 13# spring while chambering a round along the way is going to be anywhere near the force of pressurized gases that sent the slide back and was strong enough to squeeze a metal bullet through undersized hole and send it flying at 800+ FPS. I’d expect most of the stresses happen during firing, not slide returning to battery.
 

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With all due respect, there’s no way the inertia of a slide pushed by a 13# spring while chambering a round along the way is going to be anywhere near the force of pressurized gases that sent the slide back and was strong enough to squeeze a metal bullet through undersized hole and send it flying at 800+ FPS. I’d expect most of the stresses happen during firing, not slide returning to battery.
It's a wise thing to assume that the engineers designing the LCP didn't know that!
 

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With all due respect, there’s no way the inertia of a slide pushed by a 13# spring while chambering a round along the way is going to be anywhere near the force of pressurized gases that sent the slide back and was strong enough to squeeze a metal bullet through undersized hole and send it flying at 800+ FPS. I’d expect most of the stresses happen during firing, not slide returning to battery.
The LCP (along with most other autoloading pistols) is NOT gas-operated. What drives the slide back is simply inertia (of the moving bullet and the volume of gas trapped behind it while in the barrel). The recoil spring is retarding the rearward slide motion while storing energy required to return the slide forward into battery.
 

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The LCP (along with most other autoloading pistols) is NOT gas-operated. What drives the slide back is simply inertia (of the moving bullet and the volume of gas trapped behind it while in the barrel). The recoil spring is retarding the rearward slide motion while storing energy required to return the slide forward into battery.
I was not saying it’s the direct gas on piston operation, merely stating that there’s a direct relationship between the force of pressurized gases, and recoil.

If you watch the slow motion video of a handgun been fired, it takes almost 4 times as long for the spring to return the slide to battery, as it takes for the recoil to push it backwards.


Now granted this is a different gun, but the principle is the same. The distance traveled being the same, I’d say the force sending the slide backwards is *about* 4 times more than the force of the spring pushing it forward. A stiffer spring will result in less impact stress on the polymer frame in the back, and more stress on the metal slide, and it seems that the frame cracking in the back contributes to most reported failures ?
 

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It's a wise thing to assume that the engineers designing the LCP didn't know that!
The engineers designing the LCP had to balance many factors, including the ease of racking the slide. A stiffer recoil spring makes it harder to rack, and there were plenty of complaints even with a weaker 9lbs spring. AFAIK the Gen 2 which is what I have is 11lbs, with same slide and frame as Gen 1. So the Ruger engineers had no problem raising the spring rating by 22% - following aftermarket availability.
 

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Gen1 LCP's springs were 9# Gen2's were reported to be 11#. Yes it was Rugers suggestion/solution to have the springs changed frequently. I have over 2500 on my 12# springs and still going without issues. I am not a Guru either but I have worked with a Gunsmith a few years ago mostly on 1911's and SA revolvers.
 

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As an interesting note... The first experimentation's with swapping the recoil springs out in LCP's were using P3AT springs by Wolff. Factory springs in the P3AT were 11#'s. The aftermarket springs were rated 14, 15, and 16#'s. These springs were running great in the P3AT but were met with only a few hicups on the LCP's. Wolff reduced the offerings to the 11, 12, and 13# range for the LCP. Sales of both kits continued to owners of LCP's who were wanting to see where the benefits cut off. Reviews were written and are somewhere back in archives.
 

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Too bad Ruger doesn't have forums design their firearms, think of the money they would save not having a building full of expensive engineers and gunsmiths.
 
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The engineers designing the LCP had to balance many factors, including the ease of racking the slide. A stiffer recoil spring makes it harder to rack, and there were plenty of complaints even with a weaker 9lbs spring. AFAIK the Gen 2 which is what I have is 11lbs, with same slide and frame as Gen 1. So the Ruger engineers had no problem raising the spring rating by 22% - following aftermarket availability.
Former Industrial Engineer here. An engineering compromise for marketing, manufacturing, customer support and aesthetic design was never my 'best' engineering solution. :)
 

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Too bad Ruger doesn't have forums design their firearms, think of the money they would save not having a building full of expensive engineers and gunsmiths.
HaHa, Don't think the engineers are not here just like us end users looking for info. Our gripin', moanin' and tweaks are dimensional and aesthetic changes for the next project.
 

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I'm sure that like so many others, I found this thread after having just picked up the LCP Max. I don't have any problems racking the slide (no arthritis currently), but I found that the OEM spring at 10.5 or 11 lbs. Causes the occasional failure to feed. Now that probably wasn't an issue with the LCP 1, but I've got twice as many rounds in my magazine as you have. So what you experience once every 3 mags, I might run into every other magazine! I was looking into the highly affordable Wolff spring set, and thinking about maybe getting a stainless steel guide rod eventually as well (rust sucks) - but thankfully I found this thread before wasting my money. I'm not a gunsmith or an engineer, I don't know how the trigger on my pistol works - and I don't need to; because I do know that the engineers at Ruger designed it to work the way it does, and as so many others have said, I don't need to try and understand the intricacies of this tiny machine, it could be a fatal move on my part to try and learn how the trigger mechanism works and to tinker with it. The same goes for the recoil springs I've learned from reading here. So now instead of installing a heavier spring, I just send my LCP Max back to Ruger or ask the safety officer at my local range to help me when the slide is out of battery. It costs a bit more in shipping to and from, but definitely less than it would cost to take an engineering course at the community college and try to understand the complex relationship and mechanics between slide, barrel, recoil spring assembly, etc.

Another thing this thread has taught me that is a real game changer is that we really shouldn't consider things such as a failure to feed, or a stove pipe ejection to be "malfunctions." The negative connotation of the word malfunction leads non-engineer savvy pistol owners such as myself to believe that this is an issue, and as with any issue, I then want to 'solve it', but it isn't that simple. The stovepipe I'm experiencing for example, I naively thought was due to a less than satisfactory recoil spring, so upgrading to the 13lb spring seemed like a great idea. But it isn't a malfunction, it's an anticipated and expected outcome from the Ruger engineers. The heavier spring would be perfectly fine for my non-feeble hands to rack, but Ruger isn't in the customization and personalization business and so they opted for a lighter recoil spring that had an acceptable compromise between ease of racking for ALL users, and an anticipated acceptable amount of stovepipe ejections. So you see, it isn't a malfunction - it's a trade off! My range safety officer keeps telling me I should write to Ruger and get a new recoil spring, or install something heavier as he can't be responsible for clearing my jams in the field - but once I explained to him that it wasn't a malfunction, it was a compromise, and that the pistol wouldn't jam if/when I needed it in a life or death situation, because Ruger engineers and forum engineers say it isn't a range gun and it will work for it's intended purpose (even if it doesn't work at the range) - he saw the light.

As for the stainless steel guide rod though - can I install that though? It is the same size and dimensions as the OEM guide rod, just made from a different and more costly material. The engineers at Ruger I spoke with said they tested many materials, but the final selection was by the marketing team as it was their preferred blend of consumer cost, weight, and durability. But since it is functionally equivalent, tell me forum engineers, can I use it or not?
 

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Welcome to the forum! Your weapon should never stovepipe and should always go into battery. There is something wrong with it. Call Ruger and they will email a shipping label and you will receive your weapon back repaired for free in about a week. Denny
 

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Oh also - the main reason I came here, what do folks think about the Sigurd short stroke trigger and are there any other LCPII/LCP Max trigger options that anyone has used? For obvious reasons, I wouldn't actually install one on my pistol, but I'm curious what some of the less risk adverse folks on the forum have done. So other than Galloway Precision, what options are there?
 
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