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I too believe a laser on this class of handgun a bit of over kill and have stated before money better spent on practice. My training with this class of handgun is mostly point and shoot, looking for a red dot that has a tendency to wash out in bright light or mechanical failure of the laser device like battery failure where valuable time is wasted looking for a nonexistent dot and figuring that out and still ending up point and shoot could be deadly.

Murphy loves high odds and is always waiting on the sideline to step in.

If you are shooting defensively at more than 7 to 10 yards you better have a good lawyer for both criminal and civil law. If you can’t shoot accurately at that range; money better spent on practice, if your training did not cover firing, weak hand, prone position and any other position for defense you might upgrade your training as well if you are going to carry.
IMHO
 

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Sluggo said:
Y'all make a number of good arguments for and against - but - I can't find any downside, other than cost. It isn't in the way and doesn't prevent or hinder either point and shoot or aimed fire.

If you want to see what it's really for - try this exercise. Plop yourself in your favorite chair, turn out the lights, and draw Elsie. Point her at an object you cannot see, but you know perfectly well where it is. Now squeeze the laser switch. Ok, who moved the coffeepot?

Try it again from your bed. Who'da thunk that lamp was two feet to the right of where you THOUGHT it was? Can you really hit the doorway?

This is the real value of the laser. Another is training in point and shoot - draw, light, snap. You can see what your version of trigger control is doing to the point of aim. Usually, unless you have been practicing a lot, it ain't real purty. There are many ups, and darn few downs. I wouldn't be without it; it has done wonders for my confidence.

Sluggo
Boy I would hate to be a family member in your house after dark.
 

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ToddG said:
There have been some pretty serious misconceptions put forth in this thread.

I can point shoot just fine out to 7yd. Swell. Me, too. But with a laser on my gun, when I point shoot, I have a visual aiming reference that lets me guarantee more accurate and faster hits. The number of people who miss while point shooting at 7yd (or 5yd or 3yd) is pretty significant. Another major benefit of the laser is that you don't have to have a strong indexed position to "point shoot" accurately. I can hold my gun anywhere -- shoulder point, at my hip, over my head, even between my legs -- and still get equally accurate hits.

You can't see the laser well enough to depend on it. OK, you can't see the laser under every conceivable circumstance and environment. First, most people who complain about the visibility of the laser don't have significant experience with them. Second, even if the laser is only going to help you when lighting is dim, we know that 80%+ of domestic LE and private citizen gun fights occur in reduced lighting. If it's going to be a help 80% of the time and has no downside the other 20%, why not have it?

The laser wobbles around too much. The laser doesn't wobble any more than your bullet path. It simply shows you how big your wobble zone is, something that is hidden when point shooting or using your sights. The benefit is that, because you can see the wobble, you can better control where your shots land.

Lasers aren't useful on small pocket guns. Probably the most popular and universally accepted platform for a built in handgun laser is the S&W j-frame. It's an outstanding example of taking a relatively difficult to shoot gun and maximizing it's ability as an effective fighting tool.

Shooting someone beyond 7yd will get you in trouble with the law. This is utter BS. I'm not aware of a law in any state that specifies the distance at which lethal force is justified. If someone 10yd or 15yd or 25yd away from me is shooting at me, I'm equally justified in defending myself. If I can hit him from that far away, he can hit me. The law may require me to retreat, but only if I can do so safely. I don't consider rounds flying at my head safe. YMMV.

As someone who has been using lasers on handguns for more than a decade, my experience has been that the only people who don't like them are ones who don't understand them and have little (or no) formal training in how to capitalize on their capabilities. The reality is that there are things you can do with a laser on your pistol that you cannot do without a laser on your pistol. You don't want to spend the money, hey, that's your choice. But suggesting that it's a waste of money is simply trying to justify your decision.
Your statement is just as self serving justifying your purchase.

It is all up to the individual.

Maybe Ruger should just integrate a laser into there design if it is a incomplete product and by pass the middle man....Mo Money, Mo Money.
 
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