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This is just my opinion but I think putting a laser on the LCP is overkill. This gun is a point and shoot gun to be used for short distances which it does well. I just can't see spending half of the purchase price on a laser. Maybe if I was better off financially, I would splurge on a laser, but for now I am happy with it without the laser. Will be more happy when Ruger ships it back from repairs and recall.
 

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There is a huge difference between "I can't justify the expense" and "it's overkill."

Have you done any force on force training? A laser is an extremely effective and intuitive tool for making that "point and shoot gun" hit where you want it to.
 

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Your missing the point of having a laser sighting tool. A good reason would be the time you cannot aim the traditional way. Like falling down, fleeing in one direction and shootin in another and from the hip. The list continues.
The Shooter
 

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I tend to agree with 'hargroderauto'. In a defensive situation at 21 feet or less, I just say point the little pocket canon and fire till it's empty. If you can't hit a BG who is on top of you, then you really don't need to be carrying.

As for the statement... "I can't justify the expense" and "it's overkill.", I also agree. If it's overkill, I would have to justify the expense no matter what my financial status, and I don't think the LCP is worth that kind of money putting extras on it that cost half of what the gun is valued at.

But then, what do I know about formal training?

As they say... each to his own.

Note: this would make an interesting Poll if someone wants to post one up.
 

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I too believe a laser on this class of handgun a bit of over kill and have stated before money better spent on practice. My training with this class of handgun is mostly point and shoot, looking for a red dot that has a tendency to wash out in bright light or mechanical failure of the laser device like battery failure where valuable time is wasted looking for a nonexistent dot and figuring that out and still ending up point and shoot could be deadly.

Murphy loves high odds and is always waiting on the sideline to step in.

If you are shooting defensively at more than 7 to 10 yards you better have a good lawyer for both criminal and civil law. If you can’t shoot accurately at that range; money better spent on practice, if your training did not cover firing, weak hand, prone position and any other position for defense you might upgrade your training as well if you are going to carry.
IMHO
 

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I carry a j-frame and will use the LCP for a backup (reload). I gave a lot of thought to my carry gun choice and never once considered carrying a j-frame WITHOUT a laser.

Lasers have come a long way. They are very dependable, don't interfere with using the gun's sights if they were to fail, and weigh next to nothing.

More than one expert, who should know, has stated that now that lasers for j-frames are so good, they consider them an almost mandatory purchase (assuming one has the money available to spend).

Some will disagree with that statement and that's OK. I happen to agree with it. What has been said for the laser equipped j-frame is also true for the LCP (IMO).

My LCP will sport one for sure.
 

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Intimidation factor is priceless. If they see the dot and run, you dont have to shoot them. You should be mentally prepared to shoot someone if you HAVE to, but nobody should ever WANT to shoot someone.
 

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Snubbie K said:
I carry a j-frame and will use the LCP for a backup (reload). I gave a lot of thought to my carry gun choice and never once considered carrying a j-frame WITHOUT a laser.

Lasers have come a long way. They are very dependable, don't interfere with using the gun's sights if they were to fail, and weigh next to nothing.

More than one expert, who should know, has stated that now that lasers for j-frames are so good, they consider them an almost mandatory purchase (assuming one has the money available to spend).

Some will disagree with that statement and that's OK. I happen to agree with it. What has been said for the laser equipped j-frame is also true for the LCP (IMO).

My LCP will sport one for sure.
agree, I had a CT on my J frame model 60 and trust me I was deadly with it compared to no CT . amazing what the little dot can do for accuracy out of a 1 3/4" bbl. It sure amazed the hell out of me. Indeed they hve come a long way and are very durable .
 

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"...In a defensive situation at 21 feet or less, I just say point the little pocket canon and fire till it's empty. If you can't hit a BG who is on top of you, then you really don't need to be carrying."

You can still do that AZ with a laser installed. A laser simply allows you additonal options that could very well come in handy. There is nothing lost by having a laser. Instead there are gains to be had assuming you practice accordingly.
 

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I think the CT laser for my LCP was worth every penny :)
 

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ToddG said:
There is a huge difference between "I can't justify the expense" and "it's overkill."

Have you done any force on force training? A laser is an extremely effective and intuitive tool for making that "point and shoot gun" hit where you want it to.
Especially when stumbling around being just woke up at nite by an intruder, got lasers on all my guns, just another small edge lol.
 

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Is a laser sight a good investment?

There have been many discussions in addition to this one on whether a Laser Sight such as a Crimson Trace LaserGrip/LaserGuard is a good value since it may add 50% to the cost of the combination over just the gun alone. Here is my case for it.

A laser sight has both tactical and training benefits. I only know about the tactical benefits through reports from others such as Todd Green on his pistol training website http://Pistol-Training.com/ and the videos on the Crimson Trace video http://crimsontrace.com/Home/Videos/tabid/396/Default.aspx. Rather than repeat the benefits here, I recommend that you take a look at the referenced material. I hope to take force on force training before the end of next year so I can have experiential knowledge about the benefits as well.

With respect to the training benefits, the above references have much to present, but I have personal anecdotal evidence as well. When I was learning to fly I learned that many of the skills that you hone by practice are perishable skills decreasing exponentially with time. The largest loss of skill occurs immediately after the training. As time progresses without renewing your skill, it continues to deteriorate a little less each day, but deteriate none the less. After 30 to 60 days without flying I would want to take a ride with a check pilot to bring my skill level up to a level where I would again be safe.

I submit that of the several factors involved with accurate pistol shooting, trigger discipline is one of the most important and furthermore, it is the type of skill that deteriorates in a similar way described above. I have neither the time nor the money to get to the range as much as would be optimal for me to maintain my trigger discipline. Dry firing with the laser and a snap cap give me a great trigger discipline training aid. The red dot on the wall 12' or so from my home office desk shows muzzle movement during trigger pull that is impossible to ignore. I dry fire both of my EDC pistols a lot. I am also working on shooting with both eyes open and point shooting. Both are still a work in progress.

With the cost of ammunition and range fees, it doesn't take very long before I have earned back the cost of the laser.

Bottom line... Even if the economics were not so compelling, the training benefits are a sufficient reason for me to own a laser sight. At this point, I do not consider a pistol EDC qualified unless it has a laser sight. To prove my conviction, I have both an M&P 45fs and an M&P 45c. I like shooting the 45fs. I love shooting the 45c. However, I EDC the 45fs because Crimson Trace does not have a LaserGrip for the 45c.
 

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Y'all make a number of good arguments for and against - but - I can't find any downside, other than cost. It isn't in the way and doesn't prevent or hinder either point and shoot or aimed fire.

If you want to see what it's really for - try this exercise. Plop yourself in your favorite chair, turn out the lights, and draw Elsie. Point her at an object you cannot see, but you know perfectly well where it is. Now squeeze the laser switch. Ok, who moved the coffeepot?

Try it again from your bed. Who'da thunk that lamp was two feet to the right of where you THOUGHT it was? Can you really hit the doorway?

This is the real value of the laser. Another is training in point and shoot - draw, light, snap. You can see what your version of trigger control is doing to the point of aim. Usually, unless you have been practicing a lot, it ain't real purty. There are many ups, and darn few downs. I wouldn't be without it; it has done wonders for my confidence.

Sluggo
 

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Sluggo said:
Y'all make a number of good arguments for and against - but - I can't find any downside, other than cost. It isn't in the way and doesn't prevent or hinder either point and shoot or aimed fire.

If you want to see what it's really for - try this exercise. Plop yourself in your favorite chair, turn out the lights, and draw Elsie. Point her at an object you cannot see, but you know perfectly well where it is. Now squeeze the laser switch. Ok, who moved the coffeepot?

Try it again from your bed. Who'da thunk that lamp was two feet to the right of where you THOUGHT it was? Can you really hit the doorway?

This is the real value of the laser. Another is training in point and shoot - draw, light, snap. You can see what your version of trigger control is doing to the point of aim. Usually, unless you have been practicing a lot, it ain't real purty. There are many ups, and darn few downs. I wouldn't be without it; it has done wonders for my confidence.

Sluggo
Boy I would hate to be a family member in your house after dark.
 

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Sluggo said:
Y'all make a number of good arguments for and against - but - I can't find any downside, other than cost. It isn't in the way and doesn't prevent or hinder either point and shoot or aimed fire.

If you want to see what it's really for - try this exercise. Plop yourself in your favorite chair, turn out the lights, and draw Elsie. Point her at an object you cannot see, but you know perfectly well where it is. Now squeeze the laser switch. Ok, who moved the coffeepot?

Try it again from your bed. Who'da thunk that lamp was two feet to the right of where you THOUGHT it was? Can you really hit the doorway?

This is the real value of the laser. Another is training in point and shoot - draw, light, snap. You can see what your version of trigger control is doing to the point of aim. Usually, unless you have been practicing a lot, it ain't real purty. There are many ups, and darn few downs. I wouldn't be without it; it has done wonders for my confidence.

Sluggo
Sluggo,

This is exactly what I do while watching TV except I use a blue gun with a laser attached. Also, you don't have to turn the lights off to do this drill. The key is to get a sight picture then use the laser to see how close/far you were from the target. This is where a controllable activation switch is very handy. With enough practice you will be surprised how close you will get to the target using the laser as instant feedback to build up the muscle memory. This along with dry fire practice are both excellent uses of the laser for training.

Dan
 

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Again, what is the downside if any about dry fireing the LCP? I know that there have been pro's and con's about this, generally, do most folks feel that this is ok?

Does anyone know what the factory says about it?

JS
 

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TheShooter said:
Try to do this with a LCP without a Crimson Trace. Shot at 20 yards standing un-supported. Reason enough for me.

The Shooter

Hi Shooter!
I have really been looking at getting one of these but I just can't overcome a few problems.
*Under what conditions can you see the laser on the target at 60 ft? I shoot outside.
*How on earth can you be steady enough that far away to make a small group? The 2 times I've tried lasers I was shaking all over the place and farther away was worse.
*Is the button a problem with only 2 fingers on the grip? There has been much written on the subject here in the forum.

I'd really appreciate your input on any of these issues. John
 

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Indeed SHOOTER, ur a shooter, I couldn't get that group out of my lcp at 20 yards off of a shooting rest.



Nice group for sure.
 

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You ask how I can see the red dot from the laser. Notice the target has a black background. It sure makes it easy. How do hold so steady? Well that is trigger/finger control. You start by purchased a set of strengthening springs grip things at Wal-Mart. They cost about $8.99 per pair. Work on your grip first. Then purchase a set of dry-fire caps for a revolver and dry fire it to death. Then put a dot on the wall (orange or black works best) . And while holding the pistol completely still and fire it at the dot, make sure it’s empty first. Do this a couple thousands times. Reference the button for the laser. I'm lefthanded and they never seem to be a problem. Then go shoot your LCP
 
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