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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, no hate replies please (reference to my other firearm will surely spawn strong opinions):

Took the LC9 to the range for the first time today and I could not hit for crap. I know it's a long trigger pull (function of being DAO?), but no matter how hard I tried to steady it, I couldn't find anything consistent. (15 rounds out of 50 landed in an 8" target at 25')

I was consistently shooting 2" groups with my (cough) Hi-Point C9. The blow back design as well as the weight of the slide definitely reduce recoil.

I guess my question is: How long did it take others to acquire the right feel for the trigger on the LC9? Are Galloway Precision Parts destined to become my next outlay of cash?

Any advice will help.
 

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A few things come to mind - none intended to be condescending:
1) breathing control while pulling trigger
2) I don't like staging, I prefer fluid consistent trigger pull with the pad of my index finger (tip)
3) try shooting with a friend and have them randomly insert a snap cap in your magazine. When you hit that round if you're pulling, it will be obvious.
4) is every shot a surprise when it actually fires? If not, you're anticipating and shanking them.
5) lastly, are you sure you were shooting the right caliber ammo? I know someone that accidentally loaded a mag of 380 into his Glock 26 and couldn't figure out why he couldn't hit the target. He's actually a good shot, but was talking at the range and the distraction caused him to make a mistake.
I think we all have better and worse days in the range. Stressful work shows up everywhere - even the range.
 

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Good things to work on for sure sixstring. Dr. Photo, the quickest way to find an answer is to have somebody that you know to be a relatively good shot to run a few magazines through the pistol. If they are clearly better, then you have to look inward. Normally I would mention quality ammo, but at 25 ft. ammo is probably not the answer. Good luck. It will all work out. And don't get in a big hurry to spend more money.....unless it is on ammunition.
 

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Practice in regard to the shooting concerns.

Regarding your other Piece, LOL. I own a stack of Rugers, but loads more of stuff by the Other Guys.
 

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Great information here, can't add much advice that hasn't been said, but I have different name brands of pistols, Ruger, Taurus, ect... Yes... I also have a Hi-Point c9. It's actually a strait accurate shooter and runs 100%. It really doesn't make the range but when outdoors camping fishing its a great dependable shooter (mine anyways) and is a good truck gun. It could just be you're coming from a heavy low recoil 9mm pistol to a small light compact 9mm pistol, big difference. Be patient with the LC9 and don't get in a hurry. It will become your's soon. It's worth it.
 

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As for haters, we don't do much of that here other than in fun. In the past the mods would address that pretty quickly. As for the members, if there is a hater and there happens to be an old school member nearby the hater will be killed. Otherwise, we just shun them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all of the replies. I am quite new to handgun shooting and the C9 was a great introduction to the scene (low cost, low recoil, accurate, dependable). My wife and I are taking the class for our CCW (required in OH) this weekend and after fondling the LC9 in my local gun store (as well as reading every review I could find) I fell in love with this piece. I am really looking forward to gaining the confidence with this gun that I have with my C9.
 

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Ditto on the flinching. I'm constantly working on controlling it. I don't have as much trouble with the P226, but the small guns amplify the affect more. It's the same with all my small guns, including revolvers. The LC9 long trigger pull, plus my finger rubbing the inside of the trigger guard, and the need for my finger to slip down on the trigger to continue to press it to the break, all contribute throwing my aim off. Throw in uncontrolled shot anticipation with the short barrel makes a formula for throwing the bullet impact way off.

I found the following things help me. 1) If your range allows, move the target closer, maybe 8-10 feet. Practice to get proficient and confident there, then start moving the target out more and more. 2) Dry fire a lot to develop grip and finger control. 3) periodically apply the suggestion already mentioned by a previous poster to mix in snap caps to check how you are doing on flinching.

Good luck and let us know how your practice is coming along.
 

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The first time I took my LC9 to the range I couldn't hit anything. I was used to shooting 1911s and single action revolvers. My biggest mistake was shooting the 1911 first and then shooting the LC9. The next trip to the range I shot the LC9 first and used one fluid trigger pull. The results were much better. After 400 or so rounds I became acclimated to the D/A trigger on the LC9 and have become much better at hitting what I aim at within 15 yards or so. I've never shot my LC9 at the 25 yard line. I stick to yardages that one would most likely need to defend themselves.
 

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My first range trip with the LC9 I had same prob. Hit everything with my Glock. Couldn't hit squat with LC9.
I then noticed my rear sight was loose. Went to counter, borrowed an Allen wrench. Prob solved. I was a little embarrasses because I went through 100 rounds wondering why I was so bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Any recommendation on finger placement? I'm already trying to squeeze in one smooth stroke (like on a revolver) instead of stacking. I've seen some suggesting that you use the distal joint instead of the pad of the index finger. I noticed while drying firing that I was pulling to the right when I use the pad (since the trigger has to travel clear to the frame).
 

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I guess it all depends on your geometry. When I said to use the pad of your index finger, that's how I was taught in the military. I'd use whatever worked best.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, I completed the Ohio mandated CCW class this weekend and had no issues. I've been dry firing with snap caps everyday since I first took the LC9 to the range and I'm starting to get a better feel for the trigger. I do need a lot more range time to work on my grip since this is such a thin gun. I field stripped the gun for the first time yesterday after I got home from the class, cleaned EVERYTHING and applied Remington Dry-Lube to places I didn't want oil to cause build up. What a difference. I still only have about 150 rounds through it, but after cleaning the hammer and spraying it with the dry lube, the trigger feels completely different. I used to feel a small catch about 3/4 through the pull. Now it's nice and smooth all the way to the break. Looking forward to hitting the range to see the effect.

Thanks again everyone for all of the advice!

(BTW: The wife took the class too and kicked butt on the range with her Hi Point C9. Now she wants a pink LC9 for Christmas)
 

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The LC9 is a great pistol with learning curve. I found that for those that don't train hard with it that staging the trigger works best. If you have the time to train hard with it then use the old DAO trigger pull for a revolver. Also, my finger contacts the trigger almost at the distal joint instead of the middle of the finger pad. Everyone's hands are not alike so use what is best for you. You have to have a firm grip on the LC9... If not it can be a trifle snappy.
 

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The LC9 is a great pistol with learning curve. I found that for those that don't train hard with it that staging the trigger works best. If you have the time to train hard with it then use the old DAO trigger pull for a revolver. Also, my finger contacts the trigger almost at the distal joint instead of the middle of the finger pad. Everyone's hands are not alike so use what is best for you. You have to have a firm grip on the LC9... If not it can be a trifle snappy.
Because the LC9 is really intended for one purpose - up close last-ditch combat shooting to save your life in a fight, it's totally wrong in my opinion to train with it as if it were a target pistol. In combat, you will fight the way you trained.

"Staging" the trigger wastes valuable time - time which you would not have to spare in a fight for your life. In fact, using the sights to gain the perfect sight picture with a pistol like the LC9 or the LCP also will waste valuable time. You need to learn to point-shoot accurately and quickly with these pistols.
 

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Target Correction.jpg


Here you go courtesy of a variety of sources. Note the copy right information and terms of use. It's a Freebie as long as the logos are on it. Left click to enlarge.

I've used this and similar ones at the range when I have an "Off Day". Print one out and stick it in a range box or bag. Nothing wrong with some practice.
 

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Use chart Bgoff posted and go have some fun. Shoot the gun some more. Shoot it the way you want. Pull the trigger the way you want. Just throw plenty of lead and pay attention to what works for you. My first two rules for defensive carry of a weapon:
1. Have a gun...on you.
2. Have a gun on you that you have shot......a lot.
Now relax and go shoot that gun some more.
 

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I shared some of the issues you mentioned with the lc9. It was disturbing enough that I contemplated switching away from mine as my primary carry. After a long thread in another forum, it was suggested that I put a peice of gas hose over the hammer on my empty LC9, rack it and start pulling the trigger... fast and often. I began this activity at the start of a Browns game and finished as the game clock finished.

My trigger finger and grip were sore and felt like they should be blistered stumps afterwards. However the trigger smoothed out to a wonderful smooth crispness and, believe me, my trigger finger had muscle memory that may never diminish. The LC9 is a keeper!
 

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Because the LC9 is really intended for one purpose - up close last-ditch combat shooting to save your life in a fight, it's totally wrong in my opinion to train with it as if it were a target pistol. In combat, you will fight the way you trained.

"Staging" the trigger wastes valuable time - time which you would not have to spare in a fight for your life. In fact, using the sights to gain the perfect sight picture with a pistol like the LC9 or the LCP also will waste valuable time. You need to learn to point-shoot accurately and quickly with these pistols.
I agree with most of this for sure. The trigger staging comment was just for clearing up a point and proving that you can be accurate with this pistol. I would not recommend staging as a training point although some do. I use the same trigger pull on my LC9 as I do on my LCR and whether you press the trigger fast or slow you must do it smoothly.
 
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