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I am thinking about the Galloway 20lb spring for the LC9? Yea or Nay ?
Does it make any felt difference?
 

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Welcome to the forum from Western Pa. I read a lot about the 20 pound spring and its should tame the recoil down quite a bit. A lot of blogs are saying yea but no one is saying anything about the long term effects about it. My thoughts and question would be what would Ruger say about the warranty on the LC9 with a 20 pound spring?
 

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For me, NO WAY! Total waste of money. Get the New LC9S if you can, and you will see a huge difference in trigger, and recoil. Personally I never thought either model has much recoil. Better to just replace springs with factory more often. Save some money.
 

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I am thinking about the Galloway 20lb spring for the LC9? Yea or Nay ?
Does it make any felt difference?
Why do you think you need to change the recoil spring in your pistol? Is it simply because advertising and a few forum posts say that it is a good thing to do or do you actually have a problem with the pistol that a stronger spring MIGHT solve?
 

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I changed the spring in my 1911 and it made a big difference. I have also shot other guns that had stronger springs installed and it made a big difference.
I have a Springfield XDS 3", 45ACP, and it is suprisingly tame. One of the reasons is a strong recoil spring.
I am not a fan of Stryker fired guns, so I am just trying to help my LC9 be a better shooter.
 

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I went to the site that sell the spring sets for the LC9 and LC9s. At the spring info page for each model they mention ammo limitations. For the LC9s they mention 3 or 4 types of ammo your weapon will not work with anymore. The 9s installation video mentions the new striker spring is lighter than the original. The striker spring is just like a hammer spring and if you lighten it up you have the chance a light primer strike and your round will not fire. Using those products makes no sense to me.
On a hammer fired weapon the hammer is partially cocked on a double action (LCP)(LC9) and fully cocked on a single action (1911) as the slide moves rearward.
On a striker fired weapon, (LC9s, Glock, SR9c) the striker is cocked as the slide moves forward.
There is a fine line when you mess with spring rates. Heavy springs on a LCP and LC9 will make them more prone to limp wristing, shooting on the move, and weak hand shooting malfunctions. Using a weak striker spring on your 9s carry weapon might cause light primer strikes.
If felt recoil is an issue try one of the fine 9mm 147grain subsonic loads in your carry weapon with the stock springs. Denny
 

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Well said Denny. There is always a trade off involved in after market springs. It appears that most folks that want a aftermarket spring, do so, to reduce recoil. Years ago when I purchased my first LCP, I bought into the "Wolf Springs" advertising and internet fodder that always goes around. It took few hundred wasted dollars to reach the conclusion that I was trying fix a problem with the gun, when if fact the problem was myself not the Pistol. I accepted the fact that the Pistol is just by virtue of size and caliber, just a snappy gun and rather than toy with Ruger Engineering, to just learn to accept it and just shoot it until I felt comfortable with carry. I now only use the much less expensive springs, shoot the pistol with confident accuracy and am able to maintain the weapon with frequent spring changes at a minimal cost. And I have not had a malfunction in years. Ruger is pretty good at what they do, and stock springs are fine and engineered for the pistol.

The refinement of the LC9 to the LC9s were major in my opinion. The felt recoil for myself with this pistol is minimal. I find it a very comfortable pistol to shoot and to shoot accurately and extremely reliable. In fact if you go to Genitron and compare the recoil of the LC9 to the LC9S, there is a reported reduction. That combined with the very fine, not so long trigger pull aided in much more comfortable shooting. The stock LC9S in my opinion is one of the finest Pistols in modern day firearms. I personally have NO desire to tamper with perfection. Put your money into more ammo and learn to become one with the gun. Maintain your weapon on a regular basis with stock springs is my personal guide to the LC9S.
 

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I went to the site that sell the spring sets for the LC9 and LC9s. At the spring info page for each model they mention ammo limitations. For the LC9s they mention 3 or 4 types of ammo your weapon will not work with anymore. The 9s installation video mentions the new striker spring is lighter than the original. The striker spring is just like a hammer spring and if you lighten it up you have the chance a light primer strike and your round will not fire. Using those products makes no sense to me.
On a hammer fired weapon the hammer is partially cocked on a double action (LCP)(LC9) and fully cocked on a single action (1911) as the slide moves rearward.
On a striker fired weapon, (LC9s, Glock, SR9c) the striker is cocked as the slide moves forward.
There is a fine line when you mess with spring rates. Heavy springs on a LCP and LC9 will make them more prone to limp wristing, shooting on the move, and weak hand shooting malfunctions. Using a weak striker spring on your 9s carry weapon might cause light primer strikes.
If felt recoil is an issue try one of the fine 9mm 147grain subsonic loads in your carry weapon with the stock springs. Denny
I did the upgrade due to failure to feeds using certain ammo, there was hardly any recoil prior.....Going to the range today for the first time since the install.....I'll see if your conclusions are true....
 

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Ruger, Smith, Glock, Kimber, ...

all have an extensive number of engineers & gunsmiths, if another slide spring weight would actually improve the firearm that is what it would ship with. There are some rather rare instances because of physical problems with the shooter a different slide spring MAY help.

Triggers/hammers/strikers are a slightly different subject. Some of the issues are driven by their legal departments, some are driven by outside forces, ie, NYPD Glock trigger. But, reliability is still the overriding factor. Monkey with springs at your own peril, I frequently play with my range guns and it is amazingly easy to get them to misfire, but my carry guns stay pretty stock.
 

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I would be interested to see specifically what ammo is causing the problem. Good Luck at the range, have fun.
 

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Well, the GP spring kit didn't help but I'm sure didn't hurt either.

I do believe it's the magazines, since if I only loaded 6 rounds in each, no failure to feeds.

I called Ruger after getting home from the range and explained everything that had occurred and what parts I changed.

They think it's the magazine springs that is causing the Failure To Feed and are sending me five new ones with the attachment pieces already attached.

If I'm still having issues, they want the gun back.

Can't complain on their customer service.
 

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I like the idea of 10% more power magazine springs, recoil springs are another story. Hardly ever do the weight ratings provided by spring manufacturers hit exactly the weight as listed. We've tested a bunch of recoil springs for 1911 pistols from one of the major spring makers and there is some variation in the received spring weight.
Try checking springs on a "true reading spring checker" and find out for yourself. Unfortunately, we as customers, are subject to what we assume we should be getting. All manufacturing, including springs, need to deal with acceptable "tolerances", and spring weight is no different.
 
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