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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does any one have any experience shooting the LCP at low temperatures - say gun and ammo at or below 00 F?

I live in the great Pacific Northwest, and on occasion leave the little thing in the truck during the day. I am curious if the cold effects either the pistol materials or operation or the ammo (ol' timers tell (tale?) that extreme cold can result in extreme pressures).

I am rather new to the forum, so please pardon if the question has been ask before; just kindly direct me to the information.

Geophil
 

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I've not shot my LCP in the cold, but from a weapons standpoint, it shouldn't be an issue if you use the right lubricant. Remember that cold weather (in the range you're talking) requires a lighter oil. So long as you lubricate sparingly with a lighter weight oil, you should be alright. Check out Militech; doesn't do a whole lot for corrosion prevention, but so long as you follow the instructions, it performs flawlessly in a lubricant role.

As far as ammunition goes; don't worry about it. I've fired more than my fair share of COLD weapons AND ammo; neither has ever been an issue... but the wrong lubricant certainly has. I've came back from LRRP patrols at 4am with a thick coat of frost covering everything (to include my M4)... those climates never showed an adverse effect on ammunition performance.

When it comes to cold weather, your only real concern (outside of using a light oil that wont gum up) should be making sure your weapon doesn't get enough condensation or water to freeze or rust.
 

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If you happen to live in a cold area and there are no indoor ranges?

It's been in the 20s and 30s lately in Flagstaff and I'm planning on going out maybe this weekend and shooting mine in a little. I use RemOil - a bit lighter than the Hoppes lubricant. I've already cleaned the gun once but I usually clean my carry gun every other week regardless...


I'll try to pick a cold day this weekend and report back but it really shouldn't be an issue at all. The critical thing is to keep it clean. As long as it's clean it should be just fine.
 

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cdg said:
If you happen to live in a cold area and there are no indoor ranges?

It's been in the 20s and 30s lately in Flagstaff and I'm planning on going out maybe this weekend and shooting mine in a little. I use RemOil - a bit lighter than the Hoppes lubricant. I've already cleaned the gun once but I usually clean my carry gun every other week regardless...


I'll try to pick a cold day this weekend and report back but it really shouldn't be an issue at all. The critical thing is to keep it clean. As long as it's clean it should be just fine.
Don't worry about it! When mine came back from the recall it was -29 and I went out in my woods and rapped of 50 rounds flawlessly, this proves they will work under very cold temps. ;D ;D ;D
 

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Keep in mind, unless open carrying... the pistol will typically be fairly warm. So some of these examples aren't very good examples of shooting a cold weapon.

I think the OP was saying something along the lines of having to leave the pistol in his glove box or whatever while going somewhere he couldn't carry into.
 

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Went to the range yesterday morning and had some problems. It was around ten degrees and our of forty rounds or so, I had two miss fires. Ejected the catridge and there wasn't even a firing pin strike on the primer. I have not broken mine down and oiled it yet, so I think that probably will help. Up here in Minnesoooooota I use WD40 or some other polymer for lubrication.
Another note, My Crimson Trace Laser worked just fine. The factory said it was zeroed and so it was. Nice little tool.

The LCP had laid on a table behind me as I fired some other handguns, so it was really cold when I finally got to it.
 

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cooperhawk said:
Went to the range yesterday morning and had some problems. It was around ten degrees and our of forty rounds or so, I had two miss fires. Ejected the catridge and there wasn't even a firing pin strike on the primer. I have not broken mine down and oiled it yet, so I think that probably will help. Up here in Minnesoooooota I use WD40 or some other polymer for lubrication.
Another note, My Crimson Trace Laser worked just fine. The factory said it was zeroed and so it was. Nice little tool.

The LCP had laid on a table behind me as I fired some other handguns, so it was really cold when I finally got to it.
Never have any lubricant in the firing pin channel.
 

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cooperhawk said:
Went to the range yesterday morning and had some problems. It was around ten degrees and our of forty rounds or so, I had two miss fires. Ejected the catridge and there wasn't even a firing pin strike on the primer. I have not broken mine down and oiled it yet, so I think that probably will help. Up here in Minnesoooooota I use WD40 or some other polymer for lubrication.
Another note, My Crimson Trace Laser worked just fine. The factory said it was zeroed and so it was. Nice little tool.

The LCP had laid on a table behind me as I fired some other handguns, so it was really cold when I finally got to it.
WD40 works well to clean, and it's effective around the house for a quick fix to a sqeek... but it shouldn't be used as a lubricant on your firearms. It will leave a sticky residue and isn't all that effective at preventing rust. A light grade synthetic oil would be best for cold weather... applied very lightly
 

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Might I add in terms of a tactical/defense note in here. Some of you might already realize that I am a bit of a zealot when it comes to being prepared to face a dangerous situation.

BUT:

Guns of this size class typically don't lend themselves to cold weather carry because the trigger guard is much too small to fit a gloved hand into. In my case, I carry my LCP in a pocket holster and when I leave work late at night I usually keep my car keys ready in one hand, my other hand jammed in my pocket already gripping the LCP in its holster. It helps keep my hand warm and will help me draw my weapon faster. You don't ever want to remove the gun from its holster even partially when doing this though. My practiced draw technique is to pull the gun with one finger, then wrap a second finger on the grip, moving my trigger finger into position only after a target has been acquired.


As for keeping it in your glovebox, sometimes you must, but really, what is the point of such a small gun if you're not going to keep it concealed on your person? Unless like me you drive a Jeep Cherokee that has what has got to be the world's smallest glove box. ;D
 

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DesertPunisher425 said:
cooperhawk said:
Went to the range yesterday morning and had some problems. It was around ten degrees and our of forty rounds or so, I had two miss fires. Ejected the catridge and there wasn't even a firing pin strike on the primer. I have not broken mine down and oiled it yet, so I think that probably will help. Up here in Minnesoooooota I use WD40 or some other polymer for lubrication.
Another note, My Crimson Trace Laser worked just fine. The factory said it was zeroed and so it was. Nice little tool.

The LCP had laid on a table behind me as I fired some other handguns, so it was really cold when I finally got to it.
WD40 works well to clean, and it's effective around the house for a quick fix to a sqeek... but it shouldn't be used as a lubricant on your firearms. It will leave a sticky residue and isn't all that effective at preventing rust. A light grade synthetic oil would be best for cold weather... applied very lightly
WD-40 turns thick a gummy in cold weather and thats probably why your firing pin wasn't striking. Use something like Rem-Oil on the rails, and just a tad,and I mean tad, in the firing pin channel. Your LCP should work just fine in cold weather. Extreme cold weather means below 0. Now thats a different story.
 

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I have never read anywhere where any mfg-er recommends any lubricant in the firing pin channel. just not a wise thing to do IMO. Most mfg-ers even stress to keep the channel clean and dry.

each to his own I guess..
 

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jocko said:
I have never read anywhere where any mfg-er recommends any lubricant in the firing pin channel. just not a wise thing to do IMO. Most mfg-ers even stress to keep the channel clean and dry.

each to his own I guess..
Well you might not have read it anywhere but it doesnt hurt anything. As long as you do it very, very lightly. The piring pin is metal moving in a metal channel. Anytime you have metal to metal fit you need a lubricant between them. Some guns like Glocks for example have polymer liners inside their firing pin channels and do not need any lubricant in them. The LCP does not have a polymer liner. I have been doing this for 30 + years and it has always worked for me. Never any problems!
 

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mpd563 said:
jocko said:
I have never read anywhere where any mfg-er recommends any lubricant in the firing pin channel. just not a wise thing to do IMO. Most mfg-ers even stress to keep the channel clean and dry.

each to his own I guess..
Well you might not have read it anywhere but it doesnt hurt anything. As long as you do it very, very lightly. The piring pin is metal moving in a metal channel. Anytime you have metal to metal fit you need a lubricant between them. Some guns like Glocks for example have polymer liners inside their firing pin channels and do not need any lubricant in them. The LCP does not have a polymer liner. I have been doing this for 30 + years and it has always worked for me. Never any problems!
no problems from me, just repeating what every mfg-er will tell you if asked. has to be a reason I would think. but it's ur gun and you can realy do what ever you desire to it.
 

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I use Mobil 1 Synthetic (15W-50) on all my firearms. I don't usually have to deal with ultra-extreme temperatures, but if I did, Mobil 1 Synthetic would be up to the task. Anyone with a glove box gun should really look at Mobil 1 Synthetic for its ability to lubricate at extreme temperature ranges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I appreciate all the replies. Hopefully, this will address some of the comments and questions regarding the original question.

My circumstances are probably unique. I am a geologist. The LCP is my town, around the shop and casual carry. When working in the field, I exchange the LCP for a revolver appropriate for the situation (including how I am feeling that day). Usually, my field carry is a S&W Model 65 .357mag w/ 3" bbl; but it could be a Ruger Single Six, Ruger Blackhawk .41mag or S&W Mod 63 .22 L.R. Again, it depends on the circumstances and my preference for the day.

Anyways, I frequently leave the LCP either in the truck or shop where - depending on the season - it can get either hell hot or damn cold.

In regards to lubricants, I have worked in Alaska when it has been so cold that we had to use finely powdered graphic because the petroleum based ones gummed or solidified. And, yes, it can get so cold that firing pins can become inoperable with convention lubricates. Graphite is messy business, but so is needing Bear Medicine and your gun is seized-up.

Also, with the polymers and alloys coming into vogue, I got to wondering about the differential coefficient of expansion/contraction between materials, e.g. with temperature changes, does the polymer contract and expand proportional to the alloy; does the 'works' get tighter or looser?

Finally, I have had the privilege of being "educated" by a long line of ol' timer's - customarily around campfire or wood stove in the company of a bottle of whisky. CO, WY, MT, ID and AK, I have been told of guns - primarily rifles - 'exploding' when fired when bitter cold. The 'conventional wisdom' is that when cartridges get really, real cold, high ignition pressures can occur. For my part, I can see potential metallurgical issues with the older guns, but the "excessive pressure when cold" ammo matter has been a reoccurring theme.

BTW, I am glad to have found this forum. There is more information available here than I ever had imagined. And, I thank you.

Geophil

P.S. Thank goodness for Spell Checker!
 

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I believe the Lee reloading manual makes some mention of cold temperatures affecting maximum load pressures. I don't know if there is really any serious risk of explosion though.
 

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Hmmm, never heard of or thought about pressure levels rising during extreme cold temps. I have read where some oils become as thick as peanut butter and metals becoming brittle. But we are talking temps around -20 to -50. I remember a test I think was done by Chuck Taylor where he took several pistols and a revolver or two to Alaska and tested them in the exterme cold. I do not remember the totality of the test but I remember most of the normally totally reliable autos jamming due to the cold all except for the Glock and maybe one or two others. All the revolvers worked as I remember. (makes you have even more respect for the old revelver) I do not remember any mention of pressure levels being extreme. This is something to consider if one were using say +P.38 loads or similar. Anyway most auto's will work in the normal cold weather we have here say 0 + degrees. As long as you are not using WD-40 which turns gummy in cold weather. Most modern day gun oils are designed not to do this in cold weather.
 
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