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Can anyone please recommend a Dry Fire Laser Training System compatible with the LCP II? I just cannot find any for the .22LR.
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Can anyone please recommend a Dry Fire Laser Training System compatible with the LCP II? I just cannot find any for the .22LR.
Thanks!
Nothing beats live fire . 0-21 ' or 0-7 Yards because this is the distance most shootings happen .3 Rounds to the torso 1 Round to the Head will assure a kill stopping your attacker dead in his tracks. You need to become as fast and accurate as you can keeping your shot groups 3" or under . I use the Birchwood Casey 3D Targets- 3 Pack- Mounting Tab, Unique Range Target Experience. Mounted on a 6' 2X4 or a 1x1 it gives a more life like target for realistic target practice Head ,Neck & Torso shots will be totally incapacitated by just one hit in most cases , I believe in 3 shots to the center of the torso and 1 to the head with the .22LR Handgun .I strongly recommend the CCI VELOCITOR 40 Grain Copper Plated Hollow Point as it's the Fastest at 1435 FPS most Accurate hardest hitting 40 grain .22 LR ammo on the market . I have killed both Medium and Large Game with this ammo Feral Hogs 300 & 400 pounds with head shots at a range of 60 Yards and Body shots on Coyotes at 100 yards fired from a Ruger 10/22 rifle proving the capability of this ammo .




In Greg Ellifritzs Police Forensic Study "of 154 attackers shot with a .22 LR Handgun 52.36 attackers were fatalities, 92.4 Attackers were totally incapacitated by a one-shot , it's no joke 92.4 of 154 attackers were Totally Incapacitated with just one shot and 52.36 Attackers were killed out of the 154 attackers shot with one .22 LR Handgun shot in head neck or torso." The Average engagement is 7 yards distance 21 feet to hit the head or torso with the .22LR is even easy for the beginner to shoot with its lower recoil and accuracy not to mention in the hands of a serious skilled shooter.

Some people will look at this data and say “He’s telling us all to carry .22s”. That’s not true. "Although this study showed that the percentages of people stopped with one shot are similar between almost all handgun cartridges, there’s more to the story , But places the .22LR Handgun as a contender in the self defense arena .
Take a look at two numbers: the percentage of people who did not stop (no matter how many rounds were fired into them) and the one-shot-stop percentage. The lower caliber rounds (.22, .25, .32) had a failure rate that was roughly double that of the higher caliber rounds. The one-shot-stop percentage (where I considered all hits, anywhere on the body) trended generally higher as the round gets more powerful. This tells us a couple of things .In a certain (fairly high) percentage of shootings, people stop their aggressive actions after being hit with one round regardless of caliber or shot placement. These people are likely NOT physically incapacitated by the bullet. They just don’t want to be shot anymore and give up! Call it a psychological stop if you will. Any bullet or caliber combination will likely yield similar results in those cases. And fortunately for us, there are a lot of these “psychological stops” occurring. The problem we have is when we don’t get a psychological stop. If our attacker fights through the pain and continues to victimize us, we might want a round that causes the most damage possible. In essence, we are relying on a “physical stop” rather than a “psychological” one. In order to physically force someone to stop their violent actions we need to either hit him in the Central Nervous System (brain or upper spine) or cause enough bleeding that he becomes unconscious. The more powerful rounds look to be better at doing this.
0ne other factor to consider is that the majority of these shootings did NOT involve shooting through intermediate barriers, cover or heavy clothing. If you anticipate having to do this in your life (i.e. you are a police officer and may have to shoot someone in a car), again, I would lean towards the larger or more powerful rounds."

"What I believe that my numbers show is that in the majority of shootings, the person shot merely gives up without being truly incapacitated by the bullet. In such an event, almost any bullet will perform admirably. If you want to be prepared to deal with someone who won’t give up so easily, or you want to be able to have good performance even after shooting through an intermediate barrier, I would skip carrying the “mouse gun” .22s, .25s and .32s.
Now compare the numbers of the handgun calibers with the numbers generated by the rifles and shotguns. For me there really isn’t a stopping power debate. All handguns suck! If you want to stop someone, use a rifle or shotgun! What matters even more than caliber is shot placement. Across all calibers, if you break down the incapacitations based on where the bullet hit you will see some useful information."
Head shots = 75% immediate incapacitation
Torso shots = 41% immediate incapacitation
Extremity shots (arms and legs) = 14% immediate incapacitation.
"No matter which caliber you use, you have to hit something important in order to stop someone! Despite the work it took, I’m glad I did it. The results I got from the study lead me to believe that there really isn’t that much difference between most defensive handgun rounds and calibers. None is a death ray, but most work adequately…even the lowly .22s. I’ve stopped worrying about trying to find the “ultimate” bullet. There isn’t one. And I’ve stopped feeling the need to strap on my .45 every time I leave the house out of fear that my 9mm doesn’t have enough “stopping power.” Folks, carry what you want. Caliber really isn’t all that important."
"Take a look at the data. I hope it helps you decide what weapon to carry. No matter which gun you choose, pick one that is reliable and train with it until you can get fast accurate hits. Nothing beyond that really matters!" What you should take away from this study is Caliber really isn’t all that important, but Speed, Accuracy, & Proficiency are. In other words, practice practice practice until you are fast accurate and proficient with your firearm nothing beyond that matters. " I agree with him 100 %
 
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