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Discussion Starter #1
somewhere i remember seeing some "carry conditions" and they were called cond 1 , 2 or white , red , green. Is this standards or just a homemade scale?

just wondering if everyone carries the LCP with one in the pipe and ready

Any thoughts on danger/safety of that condition ?

Thanks
 

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If I have any gun on me then one is in the chamber and ready.
 

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I consider the LCP safe enough to carry one in the pipe even holsterless, e.g. with a clip. It has a very long trigger travel and a pretty heavy trigger weight of 7 to 8 lbs. I have unsuccessfully tried to fire the LCP tucked behind my belt with a clip. Of course I was using a snap cap at the time. I also tried "holstering" and drawing, both carefully and sloppily, to see if I could catch the trigger. No luck so far.

All that being said, there are many who would suggest this is a foolish position. This is a decision one must make on their own.
 

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This is one of the classic questions that will be debated forever.
You do what you are comfortable with and practice with.
But a thought, when you need it will be quick and will you have time to rack the slide???
Abouttime
 

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I carry with one in the chamber ALWAYS. Guns nowadays are have so many internal and sometimes external safeties that accidental discharges are a thing of the past. Guns WILL NOT go off unless the trigger is pulled. With that being said, I suggest you learn to get comfortable carrying with a loaded chamber because bad guys are not going to announce themselves that they are coming! Even if you thought a threat was coming but you weren't for sure, would you draw your weapon and rack the slide in front of them? There have been too many instances in self defense scenarios that show that having a gun without a round in the chamber renders a gun useless. It is VERY common for new gun enthusiasts to be wary of carrying a loaded gun. Remember this, there is no such thing as an Accidental Discharge (AD), but rather a Negligent Discharge (ND). I suggest you go to your local gun range and take some classes there to help you get comfortable carrying with a round in the chamber. Just my .02
 

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Elsie is the option when all others are exhausted. I'm not ready for any delay if I ever need her help.
 

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Slappy said:
Guns nowadays are have so many internal and sometimes external safeties that accidental discharges are a thing of the past. Guns WILL NOT go off unless the trigger is pulled.
Actually, this is not quite true. I've been involved in a handful of "investigations" when modern guns have in fact discharged without the trigger being pulled. Most often, it involves a mechanical failure of some part or parts in the gun due either to debris or wear. It's far from common, obviously, but it certainly does happen.

And the LCP does not have a firing pin block, which is a major component in keeping most handguns drop/shock safe. Of course, measured against that is the extremely light weight of the LCP and its striker, which may not be able to build up enough momentum to break a primer even if dropped from a reasonable height.

Furthermore, whether you want to call it an AD or an ND or stupid, stupid happens. The number of people who discharge a pistol putting it back in the holster is pretty high. As enthusiasts, we're less likely to make that mistake. But the LCP is going to attract a lot of buyers who are not firearms enthusiasts.

Having said that, I personally carry mine with the chamber loaded, just like I carry my primary (M&P9). As icl said, the LCP is what comes out when everything else has already gone wrong. You have to assume one of your hands/arms might be out of the fight. With the almost non-existent sights on the LCP, racking a round into the chamber one handed is going to be a chore ... a chore you probably don't have time for.

It's also worth noting that the LCP has the kind of trigger which is most forgiving of a human-induced accident. It's long and there is constant pressure from the very beginning. You get immediate tactile feedback that the trigger is being pressed the moment you start to move it. Does it mean it's impossible to frak up and AD your LCP? No. But unless you're in the habit of "speed reholstering," your chances are improved simply by staying switched on and aware of what's happening.

Of course, I carry it in a holster that fully protects the trigger from inadvertent contact. YMMV, but I consider this a necessity.
 

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ToddG said:
Slappy said:
Guns nowadays are have so many internal and sometimes external safeties that accidental discharges are a thing of the past. Guns WILL NOT go off unless the trigger is pulled.
Actually, this is not quite true. I've been involved in a handful of "investigations" when modern guns have in fact discharged without the trigger being pulled. Most often, it involves a mechanical failure of some part or parts in the gun due either to debris or wear. It's far from common, obviously, but it certainly does happen.

And the LCP does not have a firing pin block, which is a major component in keeping most handguns drop/shock safe. Of course, measured against that is the extremely light weight of the LCP and its striker, which may not be able to build up enough momentum to break a primer even if dropped from a reasonable height.

Furthermore, whether you want to call it an AD or an ND or stupid, stupid happens. The number of people who discharge a pistol putting it back in the holster is pretty high. As enthusiasts, we're less likely to make that mistake. But the LCP is going to attract a lot of buyers who are not firearms enthusiasts.

Having said that, I personally carry mine with the chamber loaded, just like I carry my primary (M&P9). As icl said, the LCP is what comes out when everything else has already gone wrong. You have to assume one of your hands/arms might be out of the fight. With the almost non-existent sights on the LCP, racking a round into the chamber one handed is going to be a chore ... a chore you probably don't have time for.

It's also worth noting that the LCP has the kind of trigger which is most forgiving of a human-induced accident. It's long and there is constant pressure from the very beginning. You get immediate tactile feedback that the trigger is being pressed the moment you start to move it. Does it mean it's impossible to frak up and AD your LCP? No. But unless you're in the habit of "speed reholstering," your chances are improved simply by staying switched on and aware of what's happening.

Of course, I carry it in a holster that fully protects the trigger from inadvertent contact. YMMV, but I consider this a necessity.
Very good!

Might add: Best safety is keep your finger off and out of the trigger until your are going to fire.
 

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I don't see a reason not to carry my elsie with one in the pipe. I have a disantis superfly pocket hoster and it protects the trigger. It also help from printing and I always know what position the gun will be in.
 

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ToddG said:
Slappy said:
Guns nowadays are have so many internal and sometimes external safeties that accidental discharges are a thing of the past. Guns WILL NOT go off unless the trigger is pulled.
Actually, this is not quite true. I've been involved in a handful of "investigations" when modern guns have in fact discharged without the trigger being pulled. Most often, it involves a mechanical failure of some part or parts in the gun due either to debris or wear. It's far from common, obviously, but it certainly does happen.

And the LCP does not have a firing pin block, which is a major component in keeping most handguns drop/shock safe. Of course, measured against that is the extremely light weight of the LCP and its striker, which may not be able to build up enough momentum to break a primer even if dropped from a reasonable height.

Furthermore, whether you want to call it an AD or an ND or stupid, stupid happens. The number of people who discharge a pistol putting it back in the holster is pretty high. As enthusiasts, we're less likely to make that mistake. But the LCP is going to attract a lot of buyers who are not firearms enthusiasts.

Having said that, I personally carry mine with the chamber loaded, just like I carry my primary (M&P9). As icl said, the LCP is what comes out when everything else has already gone wrong. You have to assume one of your hands/arms might be out of the fight. With the almost non-existent sights on the LCP, racking a round into the chamber one handed is going to be a chore ... a chore you probably don't have time for.

It's also worth noting that the LCP has the kind of trigger which is most forgiving of a human-induced accident. It's long and there is constant pressure from the very beginning. You get immediate tactile feedback that the trigger is being pressed the moment you start to move it. Does it mean it's impossible to frak up and AD your LCP? No. But unless you're in the habit of "speed reholstering," your chances are improved simply by staying switched on and aware of what's happening.

Of course, I carry it in a holster that fully protects the trigger from inadvertent contact. YMMV, but I consider this a necessity.
Thank you for the explanation! Good post!
 

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I carry my gun's ready to go. There is not much reason to carry if you are not going to be ready to answer the call. I hope I never need to put my readyness to a test but I don't want to have to stop and think about whether my gun is ready or not. I just hope I am !!!!
 

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ToddG said:
Slappy said:
Guns nowadays are have so many internal and sometimes external safeties that accidental discharges are a thing of the past. Guns WILL NOT go off unless the trigger is pulled.
Actually, this is not quite true. I've been involved in a handful of "investigations" when modern guns have in fact discharged without the trigger being pulled. Most often, it involves a mechanical failure of some part or parts in the gun due either to debris or wear. It's far from common, obviously, but it certainly does happen.

And the LCP does not have a firing pin block, which is a major component in keeping most handguns drop/shock safe. Of course, measured against that is the extremely light weight of the LCP and its striker, which may not be able to build up enough momentum to break a primer even if dropped from a reasonable height.

Furthermore, whether you want to call it an AD or an ND or stupid, stupid happens. The number of people who discharge a pistol putting it back in the holster is pretty high. As enthusiasts, we're less likely to make that mistake. But the LCP is going to attract a lot of buyers who are not firearms enthusiasts.

Having said that, I personally carry mine with the chamber loaded, just like I carry my primary (M&P9). As icl said, the LCP is what comes out when everything else has already gone wrong. You have to assume one of your hands/arms might be out of the fight. With the almost non-existent sights on the LCP, racking a round into the chamber one handed is going to be a chore ... a chore you probably don't have time for.

It's also worth noting that the LCP has the kind of trigger which is most forgiving of a human-induced accident. It's long and there is constant pressure from the very beginning. You get immediate tactile feedback that the trigger is being pressed the moment you start to move it. Does it mean it's impossible to frak up and AD your LCP? No. But unless you're in the habit of "speed reholstering," your chances are improved simply by staying switched on and aware of what's happening.

Of course, I carry it in a holster that fully protects the trigger from inadvertent contact. YMMV, but I consider this a necessity.
Un less you pull the trigger on the lcp, it will not go bang in the position it is in. It is resting on the hammer black and is at less than half cock. if it fired off the hammer block, it would merely put a small mark on the primer, no more, no less. I have never read of any kt (which is all made with a hammer block) or for that matter any lcp that has ever went bang firing off the hammer block. Pull the trigger and indeed it will go bang, otherwise, IMO safe to carry with one in the pipe. Now to all of the above, I guess anything can happen once to... But if you cannot trust your weapon, then don't carry it..
 

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You have to assume one of your hands/arms might be out of the fight. With the almost non-existent sights on the LCP, racking a round into the chamber one handed is going to be a chore ... a chore you probably don't have time for.


Great point. Just one more reason to reinforce why I carry with one in the chamber.
 

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It's interesting to read all these posts that are pre-recall and the assumptions that the firearm wouldn't go off if dropped. I guess it just goes to show you that basic firearm safety should always be employed to any and every weapon regardless of safety features or the lack there of.

I carry with one in the chamber.
 

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Lets see, drawing from concealed carry, racking slide, getting on point, BG is in your face. I'll always carry with one in the pipe, no question about it.

Oh, BTW thats hoping there's only one BG.
 
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