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Can anyone identify what this cartridge is it was found at the range and the Head Stamp is .223 bulge in the center of the cartridge neck was made with some sort of die ? I am a stumped monkey on this one. The neck is about .30 caliber or a little bigger. Does anyone know what this is ??? Is this some sort of Wild Cat Cartridge ????
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Can anyone identify what this cartridge is it was found at the range and the Head Stamp is .223 bulge in the center of the cartridge neck was made with some sort of die ? I am a stumped monkey on this one. The neck is about .30 caliber or a little bigger. Does anyone know what this is ??? Is this some sort of Wild Cat Cartridge ????
View attachment 15453

View attachment 15454
Can anyone identify what this cartridge is it was found at the range and the Head Stamp is .223 bulge in the center of the cartridge neck was made with some sort of die ? I am a stumped monkey on this one. The neck is about .30 caliber or a little bigger. Does anyone know what this is ??? Is this some sort of Wild Cat Cartridge ????
View attachment 15453

View attachment 15454
Donno . Would firing a .223 in a 300 BO do that ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Donno . Would firing a .223 in a 300 BO do that ?
No, I don't think so. After doing some research, I tend to think it was a slam fire of a 300 blackout cartridge. This shell case was found at the range my friend picked up about 200 rounds of 300 blackout spent brass it was among that brass as well as about 1000 rounds of .223 Brass that someone did not want, my friend reloads and picks up the brass that is .223 or .300 Blackout.1000 Rounds of unprimed unfired .300 Blackout Brass costs about 200 bucks so he picks it up inspects it measures it cleans it and reloads it.

A slamfire is a discharge of a firearm occurring as a cartridge is being loaded into the chamber. Some firearms are designed to slamfire, but the term also describes a malfunction of self-loading firearms. Shooters accustomed to firearms requiring trigger activation for discharge may be unprepared for a slamfire discharge.
Slamfire occurs if the cartridge discharges as soon as it reaches the chamber, rather than waiting in the chamber to receive a firing pin impact when the trigger is pulled.
Some military firearms are designed to fire from an open bolt condition to avoid unintended discharge of a chambered cartridge cooking off in a gun barrel heated by firing previous cartridges. Activating the trigger of such firearms releases the spring-loaded bolt to move forward stripping a cartridge from the magazine into the chamber. The firing pin impacts the primer as the cartridge is chambered, and the energy released by the discharging cartridge returns the bolt into an open position while ejecting the empty case.

Firing pins intended to be activated by a trigger are either spring-loaded or free-floating. Both may move forward during the loading process when the face of the bolt hits the head of the chamber. Although the amount of forward movement is not intended to detonate the primer, slamfires occur when conditions do not match design assumptions.
Cartridges that may be entirely satisfactory in manually loaded firearms may be considered defective if they do not meet the design specifications of self-loading firearms. Primer depth is very important in centerfire ammunition. Most cartridges are assembled with the exposed surface of the primer a specified distance deeper than the base of the cartridge in contact with the bolt face. Primers with insufficient depth may be detonated by the normal amount of firing pin movement as the cartridge is chambered by forward bolt movement. Primer response to impact is a function of the thickness and hardness of the metal cup containing the detonating explosive. Primers intended to respond to the comparatively light firing pin impact of older or smaller manually-loaded firearms may be initiated by the relatively energetic self-loading process necessary to reliably chamber cartridges. Most military ammunition makes use of hard primers unlikely to be detonated by a comparatively light inertial strike. The NATO military alliance uses NATO-specific standardization agreements (STANAG)s that define the minimal and maximal allowed primer sensitivity for small arms ammunition. For 5.56×45mm NATO ammunition STANAG 4172, among a considerable number of technical requirements, specifies the permissible primer sensitivity range for 5.56×45mm NATO ammunition.

Spring-loaded firing pins may move further forward than expected during the loading process if the restraining spring is broken or weakened by age. As rust, dirt, fouling, or inappropriately viscous lubricants accumulate in the firing pin channel, both free-floating and spring-loaded firing pins may be held in a forward position protruding from the bolt face. While rust prevention is important, wet lubricants can trap carbon and other pollutants from the burning propellant, so avoidance of excess lubrication reduces the risk of slam fires from firing pins becoming stuck forward.

Anything adhering to the tip of a firing pin or the portion of the bolt face behind the primer may cause unexpectedly heavy primer contact during the self-loading process. The larger priming compound distribution area of rimfire ammunition increases the number of locations where dirt or fouling on the bolt face or in the rim portion of the firearm chamber may deform the cartridge rim enough to function as a firing pin during the self-loading process.
 
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