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I wonder what my Dad was using to clean this tail gun barrel? This is a photo taken in France close to the end of the war. The plane is an early model B-26 Marauder. Den
Dad3.jpg
 
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Cranky old man. Have to wonder, but when it comes to instructions, like, looking up a process or repair on the web? There are an overwhelming surfeit of DIY videos. What I like? Instructions. Typed out. Printed. Well, maybe not printed, but available as text block.

So I like this forum, might’ve influenced my LCP II purchase. Really love this weapon, like a lot.

Stupid new user question, what is the preferred lube and cleaning solutions for the gun?

I wouldn’t ask, but I didn’t find any other threads...
Hoppes... followed by a light coating of white lithium grease on bearing surfaces. I used this with AR15s, which are some of the most cantankerous firearms you'll find.

I do a surface wipe of the slide and clean out the fuzz once a week. I use a very light oil like Remington Rem Oil. The most vulnerable part of a self loading firearm is the magazine and thus it deserves the most attention. I wipe them inside and out, wipe the springs and lightly wipe the follower using Rem Oil. I also inspect the feed lips for distortion (former and current AR15 owners know that the original magazines were trash).

I also blow out lint from the hammer region using canned air.

I'm thinking of knocking out the firing pin retaining roll pin to degunk that too.


Everyone is going to have an opinion. This one is mine.
 

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I wonder what my Dad was using to clean this tail gun barrel? This is a photo taken in France close to the end of the war. The plane is an early model B-26 Marauder. Den
View attachment 11441
More than likely the oil used for engine lube. My dad only got to fly his P51 as the Crew Chief had final say about anything maintenance or mechanical on the aircraft. He said that his CC used to tell him "It's MY airplane, you just get to fly it!"
 
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I've been using Break free since the 80's. No problems. The LCP probably doesn't need more, but I'm now also using Slip 2000 as an oil, and it seems to slick things up pretty well.
 

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I wonder what my Dad was using to clean this tail gun barrel? This is a photo taken in France close to the end of the war. The plane is an early model B-26 Marauder. Den
View attachment 11441
Don't you think he was using a standard bore cleaner for the time, because of the concern over the damage the corrosive primers could do in a relatively short time? Or maybe just hot water at first? The standard for cleaning rifle barrels in barracks was hot, soapy water, followed by dry patches, followed by oiled patches. I am sure he was doing the same, or the equivalent. In our time of non-corrosive primers, we forget how easy we have it.
 

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Ballistol, Hoppe's, Hoppe's synthetic, Ed's Red, Hoppe's Black Rifke are all good general purpose gun solvents. Allow them time to act. Rem Bore Cleaner, Flitz Bore Cleaner, or especially, J-B Bore Cleaner combined with Kroil penetrating oil, will save you a lot of time and effort with oatches and brushes, and give you a sparkling clean bore. All are safe to use as directed. They will remove all types of fouling. Check Brownells if you can't find them locally. Always wear gloves and work in a well-ventilated place, and watch out for sources of flames!

For just copper fouling, not usually much of an issue with handguns, use products such as Sweet's or Butch's Bore Shine, following the instructions carefully. I like to use patches damp with naphtha, followed by dry patches, inbetween different products, to avoid any chemical interactions.

RemOil is a very light mineral oil and a solvent (which evaporates rather quickly). It doesn't do well in any tests for protection against rust, by the way. I like to use it to get a stiff part, such as a bolt on a rifle, working again. But it can be too light for other lubrication jobs.

IMHO Hoppe's makes a fine semi- or full synthetic oil more suited to lubricating guns. It's light, but used sparingly, will satisfactorily lubricate a considerable area. But it won't disappear. Just use it sparingly.

Lithium grease (white) is still the standard for the Queen of the Battlefield, the great M1 Garand. But for other uses, engineers and chemists have found lithium is not a good base for greases (I am a chemistry professor who has been reseaching oils and greases sinces the 1970s). Please check Grant Cunningham's lubrication guide, which you can find by Googling it. There he explains the best choices you can make today, using well-proven technologies used in industry. We've advanced well-beyond white lithium-based greases for most applications.
 

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"And just don’t overlube your little LCP . . . .
Other than regular cleaning, it is also a good idea to replace the recoil spring set of your LCP at every 500 rounds or so to keep your little gun reliable. Recoil spring in larger guns can last much more rounds. But recoil springs in pocket pistols like the LCP take a lot of beating. They are really inexpensive anyways. Buy a few sets from Ruger and keep them handy in your range bag."

First of all, Great advice! Most of my life, the advice was to caution against over-lubrication! Now, we are told to run our guns "wet" which I think comes mainly from the AR15 crowd (I like my AR, but it isn't the only -or best gun- in the world, far from it). The truth remains, that only a thin film of oil or greas will remain between parts to foster smooth movement and reduced friction and wear. The rest is wasted and holds dirt, dust, and gunk, and soils clothing. Use lubricants sparingly and wisely, with some understanding and insight into how the firearm in question works.

Secondly, a lot of us neglect to keep an eye on the number of rounds we put through our furearms. While I think 500 rounds is being more than a bit conservative concerning changing out the LCP recoil spring as suggested by an earlier poster. I'd feel quite safe in going 2000 rounds, or more, say 2500, because the recoil spring isn't likely broken in before at least 100 rounds have been fired (plus, it helps to work the slide, and to leave the slide locked backed for the first two weeks).

Has anyone queried Ruger about this?

I certainly would not carry with a new recoil spring which has been fired with fewer than 200 rounds practice ammunition, plus 50 rounds of my carry load, and which has not had the slide locked back in storage for two weeks or more inbetween range trips.

Nonetheless, it is especially true that a small blowback design places a LOT of stress on that part, and a small handgun can easily be battered by a wornout recoil spring. So better to be safe than sorry over an inexpensive part! Good call! Certainly more shooters abuse the gun by NOT changing out the recoil spring -ever! So, good call!!!

Same thing with magazine springs -clean the mags, yes, but why not keep track of them, and replace at say, 6000 rounds? Cheap enough! Is it going to break the bank?
 

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Brianm14--
On my carry guns, I use Hornady One Shot HD-Extreme(they make about three different kinds)...not much for cleaning, but the dry lubricant sure reduces lint/dust build-up in the weapon and no problem with oil stains, etc. This is based on my knowledge on the subject of lubrication, which is about "zilch", but, given the 10,000 or so recommendations of others, is probably about as reliable..........?thoughts?
Actually, I did start using the dry lubricant after reading an article by a fellow who did extensive testing on almost 50 products(Comprehensive Corrosion Test: 46 Products Compared : Day At The Range).
 

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Actually, I reviewed the above article again(about the 20th time) and found the follow up article on lubricity...final verdict: The best protectors against corrosion were Froglube, Hornday’s One Shot and WD-40 Specialist and the three best for lubricity were Froglube, Hornady’s One Shot and Barricade. For practical preference, I have chosen to go with the Hornady. Here is the ref. to both his corrosion and friction tests: https://ronkulas.proboards.com/thread/274/review-comparison-gun-care-products?page=1&scrollTo=711
 

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Brianm14 mentioned cleaning the inside of the magazines on a somewhat regular basis. Totally agree. A few trips back at the range my lcp380 would fire 2 rounds and fail to load the next round. Manually recycled the slide, fired 2 rounds and again failed to chamber. Dry cleaned the inside of the mag and spring - problem solved. I would recommend cleaning the mag every 500 rounds.
 

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Welcome to the forum LarryDodson10! Great mag maintenance advice in my view. All my LCP mags were full of grease from the factory. We must take them apart and clean before use. For those who don't want to dissemble, flush them out good with a spray cleaner.
I found a great mag cleaning brush at Walmart labeled as a bottle brush and it cost just a few bucks. My carry weapon mags are cleaned every once in a while and my competition pistol/carbine mags are cleaned every match as they are dropped in the dirt. All the mags get a light spray of dry-lube on the inside and the comp. mags get a coat on the outside.

I believe many shooters clean their carry weapons way too much citing it has to be clean for me to depend on it. Well did it work the last time you shot it? Then you can depend on it the next time you leave the house. How can you depend on a weapon you just took apart and put back together again? I sure can't.
If needed my weapons are deep cleaned before a range visit and my carry weapons if needed receive a quick clean at the range and shoot a few mags of ammo through them before leaving. This practice could have saved my behind so that's the way I role. Denny
 

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I can't recommend you on a particular oil, but do it regularly! Clean each time I go out, but then again I always shoot some pistols and never know when the pistol will be chose again.

Since the cleaning supplies are already sitting there, I'll do a quick clean of the gun before I'm done. Usually a quick clean, unless I was shooting a lot. More info on cleaning
 

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As a gun lube . I see it mentioned a lot . I like Ballistol . I can get it on my hands and not worry about it . When I was young , things like that did not bother me . Then a friend of mine who was a grease monkey died of leukemia . I used to clean carburetors in gas and wash my hands in turpentine after painting . I now wear gloves . Mobil One is probably a great lube . I just don't want to touch it a lot .
I hear ya Brother. I have tried a whole lot of stuff over the years and always came back to Ballistol. Finally enough is enough and just do not try anything else. Even use it in my Sonic Cleaner. And Not being Toxic is a huge plus. Heck, it even helps dry skin. I also use it with my bare hand to rub down wooden stocks which still look like new.
In the sonic cleaner I use Ballistol Milk. (90% water 10% Ballistol.) Magazines come out like new and so slick that they are almost too slick. Use the Milk to flush out chambers etc.

The nice thing about Ballistol, is it will never gum up. When used in a Sonic Cleaner the Milk will clean trigger parts etc and leave a Very Fine Coat of oil.

I leave a big jar of the Milk on my bench and many times will take parts or a receiver and just drop in and leave, then Blow out the Striker or firing pin chamber with a can of air.

All this said, a Sonic Cleaner is one of the best investments I have made.
 

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I have been using Break Free CLP lately with good results. For years always used Hoppe's 9 cleaner and oil with Rem Oil sometimes. Still have applications for all of them. The one I have not tried is Ballistol and may give it a try. I love taking care of my firearms-> It is great therapy after the range. One thing I do know is you can learn from these Clean/Lube threads they are interesting for sure.
 

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I hear ya Brother. I have tried a whole lot of stuff over the years and always came back to Ballistol. Finally enough is enough and just do not try anything else. Even use it in my Sonic Cleaner. And Not being Toxic is a huge plus. Heck, it even helps dry skin. I also use it with my bare hand to rub down wooden stocks which still look like new.
In the sonic cleaner I use Ballistol Milk. (90% water 10% Ballistol.) Magazines come out like new and so slick that they are almost too slick. Use the Milk to flush out chambers etc.

The nice thing about Ballistol, is it will never gum up. When used in a Sonic Cleaner the Milk will clean trigger parts etc and leave a Very Fine Coat of oil.

I leave a big jar of the Milk on my bench and many times will take parts or a receiver and just drop in and leave, then Blow out the Striker or firing pin chamber with a can of air.

All this said, a Sonic Cleaner is one of the best investments I have made.


So you just put the mags into the sonic cleaner whole without taking them apart? Afterwards how long do you let them dry out? Do u reuse the "milk". I guess so. The stuff isn't cheap. I almost never clean my mags duh.

 

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Ballistol, Hoppe's, Hoppe's synthetic, Ed's Red, Hoppe's Black Rifke are all good general purpose gun solvents. Allow them time to act. Rem Bore Cleaner, Flitz Bore Cleaner, or especially, J-B Bore Cleaner combined with Kroil penetrating oil, will save you a lot of time and effort with oatches and brushes, and give you a sparkling clean bore. All are safe to use as directed. They will remove all types of fouling. Check Brownells if you can't find them locally. Always wear gloves and work in a well-ventilated place, and watch out for sources of flames!

For just copper fouling, not usually much of an issue with handguns, use products such as Sweet's or Butch's Bore Shine, following the instructions carefully. I like to use patches damp with naphtha, followed by dry patches, inbetween different products, to avoid any chemical interactions.

RemOil is a very light mineral oil and a solvent (which evaporates rather quickly). It doesn't do well in any tests for protection against rust, by the way. I like to use it to get a stiff part, such as a bolt on a rifle, working again. But it can be too light for other lubrication jobs.

IMHO Hoppe's makes a fine semi- or full synthetic oil more suited to lubricating guns. It's light, but used sparingly, will satisfactorily lubricate a considerable area. But it won't disappear. Just use it sparingly.

Lithium grease (white) is still the standard for the Queen of the Battlefield, the great M1 Garand. But for other uses, engineers and chemists have found lithium is not a good base for greases (I am a chemistry professor who has been reseaching oils and greases sinces the 1970s). Please check Grant Cunningham's lubrication guide, which you can find by Googling it. There he explains the best choices you can make today, using well-proven technologies used in industry. We've advanced well-beyond white lithium-based greases for most applications.

Thanks!

 

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Cranky old man. Have to wonder, but when it comes to instructions, like, looking up a process or repair on the web? There are an overwhelming surfeit of DIY videos. What I like? Instructions. Typed out. Printed. Well, maybe not printed, but available as text block.

So I like this forum, might’ve influenced my LCP II purchase. Really love this weapon, like a lot.

Stupid new user question, what is the preferred lube and cleaning solutions for the gun?

I wouldn’t ask, but I didn’t find any other threads...
I have found the Lucas Extreme Duty Gun Oil & the Lucas Extreme Duty CLP , Lucas Extreme Duty Gun Grease to be the best .



 
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