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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wow, I discovered the lazer sight red light is off by three or four feet?? Is there a way to adjust the lazer sight?? Recently, I replaced the battery for the lazer sight system, could I have gotten the sight mechanism off then?

I have a Ruger .380 LCP

Thanks in advance for any advice

Lenard
 

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Wow, I discovered the lazer sight red light is off by three or four feet?? Is there a way to adjust the lazer sight?? Recently, I replaced the battery for the lazer sight system, could I have gotten the sight mechanism off then?

I have a Ruger .380 LCP

Thanks in advance for any advice

Lenard
The trigger guard mount lasers (like the ones available for the LCP) and the rail mount lasers, are adjusted with two tiny allen head (hex head) screws, usually one in the side and one in the bottom, of the laser housing. The one in the side is usually left-right (windage) and the one in the bottom up-down (elevation). Any time you remove the laser from the firearm, it's probably going to need to be readjusted.

Not sure how the rest of the world adjusts them, but assuming the iron sights are adjusted correctly, I set the laser to match the iron sights at about 35 feet, and then I keep in mind that it will be slightly high closer than that, and slightly low farther away than that. If you think your attacker will be at a different distance, adjust for that distance, and remember closer high, farther low.
Then go to the range, compare iron and laser, and adjust if needed.
 

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I'm dealing with lasers on P89 and LC9s.

My "castle" has a clear opening across of 35 feet. Coming through the front door and making a turn to my bedroom would be 17 feet.
The distance between the laser beam and the barrel center is about 1 1/2 inches on both.
Zeroed at 35 feet, at 17 feet, the point of impact of the bullet would be .75 inches above the laser dot on the target.
Holding the muzzle flat against the target, the hole would be 1.5 inches above the dot.
That's not exactly an insurmountable level of error.

I am statistically more likely to deal with someone trying to break into a car parked in front of the house. They have been carrying AR pistols and firing on anyone who confronts them, and then firing at anyone looking out of a window. The cars are 50 foot from the front door. At that range, the little red dot would be .75 inch lower than the point of impact of the bullet.

That's my compromise for my situation. Other people have different situations. I notice that most indoor shooting ranges are 150 foot long, which seems to indicate that 35 foot is quite a bit less distance than most people feel they need to be proficient at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The trigger guard mount lasers (like the ones available for the LCP) and the rail mount lasers, are adjusted with two tiny allen head (hex head) screws, usually one in the side and one in the bottom, of the laser housing. The one in the side is usually left-right (windage) and the one in the bottom up-down (elevation). Any time you remove the laser from the firearm, it's probably going to need to be readjusted.

Not sure how the rest of the world adjusts them, but assuming the iron sights are adjusted correctly, I set the laser to match the iron sights at about 35 feet, and then I keep in mind that it will be slightly high closer than that, and slightly low farther away than that. If you think your attacker will be at a different distance, adjust for that distance, and remember closer high, farther low.
Then go to the range, compare iron and laser, and adjust if needed.
Thank you so much, I found both of the adjustment screws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The trigger guard mount lasers (like the ones available for the LCP) and the rail mount lasers, are adjusted with two tiny allen head (hex head) screws, usually one in the side and one in the bottom, of the laser housing. The one in the side is usually left-right (windage) and the one in the bottom up-down (elevation). Any time you remove the laser from the firearm, it's probably going to need to be readjusted.

Not sure how the rest of the world adjusts them, but assuming the iron sights are adjusted correctly, I set the laser to match the iron sights at about 35 feet, and then I keep in mind that it will be slightly high closer than that, and slightly low farther away than that. If you think your attacker will be at a different distance, adjust for that distance, and remember closer high, farther low.
Then go to the range, compare iron and laser, and adjust if needed.
You seem to be knowledgeable about these Rugar .380 LCP weapons. I managed to drop the adjusting screw for left-right (windage), arggg....nowhere to be found on the face of the earth now :(. Do you know or perhaps anyone know the size of the screw? I will try checking with a gunsmith, but I don't have high hopes.
 

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You seem to be knowledgeable about these Rugar .380 LCP weapons. I managed to drop the adjusting screw for left-right (windage), arggg....nowhere to be found on the face of the earth now :(. Do you know or perhaps anyone know the size of the screw? I will try checking with a gunsmith, but I don't have high hopes.
Edit: The iron sight?

I'm not knowledgeable about the LCP. But the manual on the Ruger website says the part number for the rear sight is CP08001. That crosses over to be the same as the LC9 and LC380, and the manual on the Ruger website for those two have a note that the screw is:
"8-32 NC-2A x .187 Hex Soc Flat Pt- With Patch"

Sounds like a 8-32 thread, 3/16 inch long, with a dab of locktite.
 

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I have an LCP Custom and a LaserMax sight. Did the same thing you did when removing and reinstalling the laser.
Reach out to the manufacturer. They might just send you a screw at not cost...like they did for me.
 

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The trigger guard mount lasers (like the ones available for the LCP) and the rail mount lasers, are adjusted with two tiny allen head (hex head) screws, usually one in the side and one in the bottom, of the laser housing. The one in the side is usually left-right (windage) and the one in the bottom up-down (elevation). Any time you remove the laser from the firearm, it's probably going to need to be readjusted.

Not sure how the rest of the world adjusts them, but assuming the iron sights are adjusted correctly, I set the laser to match the iron sights at about 35 feet, and then I keep in mind that it will be slightly high closer than that, and slightly low farther away than that. If you think your attacker will be at a different distance, adjust for that distance, and remember closer high, farther low.
Then go to the range, compare iron and laser, and adjust if needed.
You may want to check your laser thoughts. If you are closer the laser will be lower not higher. I did the same as the other gentleman. My longest shot in the house would be about 40’ I put the laser to shoot on just shy of that. Anything closer will be slightly lower but still be center mass. Also remember the further away the laser is from the bores Axis will make a lot of difference where it will hit at different ranges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Edit: The iron sight?

I'm not knowledgeable about the LCP. But the manual on the Ruger website says the part number for the rear sight is CP08001. That crosses over to be the same as the LC9 and LC380, and the manual on the Ruger website for those two have a note that the screw is:
"8-32 NC-2A x .187 Hex Soc Flat Pt- With Patch"

Sounds like a 8-32 thread, 3/16 inch long, with a dab of locktite.
I managed to track down the manufactor, they are sending out what I need. Thanks a bunch.
 

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The LCP is a pocket pistol......practice point and shoot, forget the lasers. The threat level needs to be "up close and personal" , tough to justify self-defense at 35 feet.
I use a LC380 for self defense and draw, point, and shoot is how I practice with it. I shoot at man sized target and have gotten to point where 90% of my shots hit center of mass at 25'. Other 10% would still be inside the 8 ring on standard silhouette target.
 

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I use a LC380 for self defense and draw, point, and shoot is how I practice with it. I shoot at man sized target and have gotten to point where 90% of my shots hit center of mass at 25'. Other 10% would still be inside the 8 ring on standard silhouette target.
Good Shooting, that will get the job done.....QUICK FIRST SHOT HITS is what armed self defense is all about! Too many folks rely too heavily on sights. Focusing on sights will get you killed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The trigger guard mount lasers (like the ones available for the LCP) and the rail mount lasers, are adjusted with two tiny allen head (hex head) screws, usually one in the side and one in the bottom, of the laser housing. The one in the side is usually left-right (windage) and the one in the bottom up-down (elevation). Any time you remove the laser from the firearm, it's probably going to need to be readjusted.

Not sure how the rest of the world adjusts them, but assuming the iron sights are adjusted correctly, I set the laser to match the iron sights at about 35 feet, and then I keep in mind that it will be slightly high closer than that, and slightly low farther away than that. If you think your attacker will be at a different distance, adjust for that distance, and remember closer high, farther low.
Then go to the range, compare iron and laser, and adjust if needed.
Thanks to all who responded. I contacted the manufacture; they sent me the needed ex screws I needed.
 

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FYI, after I got my laser dialed in to my sights, I simply remembered where the dot was at 25' range in the sight picture. So when home I can align the laser against a wall 25' away. This has served me well. I can go to a range and the laser is generally where it should be. It usually doesn't drift when I change the battery, but one time it did and I fixed it. So I check the laser as part of my dry fire practice and not just when I go to the range.

Also, a trick for finding small things on a hard floor is to shine a flashlight around with it on the floor too, that will cause small objects to cast long shadows. I have found many a screw that way. Not as effective on carpet.
 
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