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Discussion Starter #1
We have an early spring this year with temperatures in the high 60's and low 70's. Getting all the leaves and winter blown debris from out and around my shooting bench these last couple of days.
Gonna delve into my .22 Rimfire Cache and shoot some groups with the ammunition I've acquired over winter:

 

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I look forward to reading your posts. You've got a fine collection of ammo to choose from.

If you are interested, Federal just announce a .22 self defense ammo called Punch. It runs about $10 for 50. I bought only 3 boxes.

It's available, which is a good thing, on the Federal.com website.
 

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Yah, thanks for that post, if I can find it I'll certainly try it. I assume it's for handguns? Now that CCI and Federal are under the same umbrella, I expect to see more good things as such, if/when it can be found.
CCI/Federal seems to be the only, USA rimfire manufacturers who are working with .22 rimfire cartridges with various burning rates that work best with shorter barrels in handguns and rifles. Previously, we had .22 Long Rifle rounds, with pretty much the same types of powder and burning rates. Now, we even have some alleged "Long Range" .22 rimfire ammunition for those who shoot at 100+ yards with their rifles:



Most likely the above powder these rounds have a slower burning rate that will work BEST in the longer barrels, like 26" & 27" .22 rifles like my Winchester Model 67A & CZ 457 LUX:




Gonna be interesting to see what the above ammunition chronographs out of those two rifles.
 

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Went to their site. Was gonna order a brick, or 3. Found this:

 

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I've performed a little 22 ammo testing but it was back in 2010. My Carbine was an Izhmash Biathlon, a entry level 16 inch barrel sport competition rifle. The bolt was a unique straight pull back design and it had the best trigger that I have ever shot.
I bought it new and had to give $300 for it and I installed a $50 18 power scope on her. With the right ammo on a calm day she would shoot an inch @ 100 yards all day long.
I used to sort my ammo for competition, well a biannual egg shoot to support the young shooters at the club.
As we know, a 22 rimfire weapon headspaces on the rim of the cartridge. I found that with ammo that my rifle seemed to like, the rim would measure the same for almost every round in the box. Some box's of ammo would only have 20 rims that measured the same but I could adjust my zero and all those rounds would group great.
The inexpensive ammo that I would sort and practice with was Federal Auto Match but every 8 rounds or so I would have a flier. Probably due to a different powder charge.
I had good success and a lot of fun sorting my ammo. Olympic shooters spend hours and hours sorting their ammo. They even weigh each round and that requires a very specialized scale.
The tool I used to measure the rim on my ammo was pretty simple. I will dig it out of storage and show it to you all. It wasn't much money and I would be happy to sell it.
My best match result was 20th out of 50 shooters. We would shoot 10 eggs with 10 rounds @100 yards with a 60 second time limit. You could watch the ark of each round as it traveled down range and the egg would blow up and fill your sight picture. Pretty cool! Denny
 
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The only sorting of .22 rimfire ammunition that I've felt was worthwhile doing, is the same as what Denny has done. Sorting for rim thickness is an endeavor that's geared toward only one variable involved with .22 rimfire ammunition, but it's a process that proves its worth in doing. Rim thickness variation, according to some of the .22 benchrest crowd, is what will contribute to those exasperating "flyers" that will ruin a perfectly forming group.
Too many variables involved with weighing loaded rounds, so I only measure rim thickness, but use a method that's pretty low cost with doing:


Using a fired .22 centerfire cartridge case, measure the over-all length of that case. I stuck this one in my case trimmer to make sure the mouth of the case was flat and the inside of the mouth chamfered to accept the rim better

Next, zero out your caliper

Then, install the cartridge that you want to measure the rim into the cartridge case.

You now have the rim thickness and can easily sort your .22 rounds for testing.
 
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